Ses 1 satellite

Ses 1 satellite DEFAULT

SES-1

NamesAMC-1R
AMC-4R
OS-1
Mission typeCommunications
OperatorSES Americom / SES S.A.
COSPAR IDA
SATCAT no.
Websitehttps://www.ses.com/
Mission duration15 years (planned)
11&#;years, 5&#;months, 24&#;days (elapsed)
SpacecraftOS-1
Spacecraft typeGEOStar-2
BusStar
ManufacturerOrbital Sciences Corporation
Launch mass2,&#;kg (5,&#;lb)
Power5 kW
Launch date24 April , UTC
RocketProton-M / Briz-M
Launch siteBaikonur, Site /39
ContractorKhrunichev State Research and Production Space Center
Entered serviceJune
Reference&#;systemGeocentric orbit
RegimeGeostationary orbit
Longitude° West
Band48 transponders:
24 C-band
24 Ku-band
Bandwidth36 MHz
Coverage areaCanada, United States, Mexico, Caribbean, Central America

SES constellation

SES-2&#;&#;

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SES-1 is a geostationary communications satellite which is operated by SES World Skies, then by SES S.A..

History[edit]

It was originally ordered by SES Americom as a ground spare for AMC-5R, however in April a decision was made to launch it, and it was named AMC-1R. It was subsequently renamed AMC-4R, and finally SES-1 after SES Americom merged with SES New Skies to form SES World Skies.[1] It was the third SES World Skies satellite to be launched following the merger, but the first to carry the new SES designation.[2] SES-1 operates in geostationary orbit, and is intended to be located at a longitude of ° West, where it will replace the AMC-2 and AMC-4 satellites, and be used broadcast high-definition television to very small aperture terminals in the United States.[3]

Spacecraft[edit]

SES-1 was built by Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC), and is based on the Starsatellite bus. It is equipped with 24 C-band, and 24 Ku-bandtransponders, and at launch it had a mass of 2,&#;kg (5,&#;lb). It has a design life of fifteen years, however it was launched with enough fuel to operate for at least sixteen years, if its systems are still functional.[1]

Launch[edit]

The launch of SES-1 was conducted by International Launch Services (ILS), using a Proton-Mlaunch vehicle with a Briz-M upper stage.[3] The launch occurred from Site /39 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, at UTC on 24 April [2] The launch successfully placed SES-1 into a subsynchronous orbit close to geostationary altitude.[3][4]

Mission[edit]

In May and June , SES-1 was positioned close to ° West to temporarily provide backup to the AMC satellite in the event that AMC could not continue broadcasting whilst it is moved out of the way of the failed Galaxy 15 satellite, which passed close to it at the end of May [5] In the end, services provided by AMC were not interrupted.[6]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SES-1

SES-1 Satellite For U.S. Put Into Orbit

SES World Skies announced Saturday the successful launch of the SES-1 satellite, which will provide coverage of the 50 U.S. states and is intended to replace SES's existing AMC-2 and AMC-4 satellites.

SES-1 was manufactured by Orbital Sciences and launched by International Launch Services (ILS) on board a Proton Breeze M booster from the Baikonour Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on April 24 at p.m. local time. Eight hours and 58 minutes after lift-off the spacecraft separated from the Breeze M upper stage and was placed into geostationary orbit, and initial signals from SES-1 were received at a control station in Perth, Australia, according to SES World Skies.

SES World Skies, which has U.S. headquarters in Princeton, N.J., was created through the combination in of the former SES New Skis and SES Americom divisions.

SES-1 -- the 42nd satellite in SES's global fleet -- is a hybrid C- and Ku-band spacecraft that will replace SES's existing AMC-2 and AMC-4 satellite at the orbital location of degrees West. The satellite carries 24 active C-band and 24 Ku-band transponders of 36 MHz capacity each; six of the channels in each band can be cross-strapped to the opposite band, enabling new service capability.

"SES-1 is an integral part of our fleet-renewal program over North America," president and CEO Rob Bednarek said in a statement. "The flawless launch of SES-1 will allow us to ensure uninterrupted service for a variety of valued customers at the key orbital position of degrees West."

SES-1 is part of an SES contract with Orbital Sciences for the provision of up to five virtually identical satellites in order to replenish SES' North American satellite fleet.

Sours: https://www.nexttv.com/news/sessatellite-us-put-orbit
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Satellite footprints

Position:° West
Manufacturer:Orbital ATK
Operator:SES
Launch operator:ILS
Launch vehicle:Proton M/Breeze
Launch date:04/24/
Expected lifetime:15 Years

Check out our 54 new and used earth station antennas

SES Americom (formerly GE Americom) awarded Orbital Sciences Corp. (Orbital ATK – Northrop Grumman) in May an order for as many as five new satellites over a multi-year period. SES Americom placed a firm order for two new satellites, the first designated as AMC-5R and the second a ground spare that was launched to another orbital location as a replacement satellite.

Deliveries of the first two satellites were scheduled for mid- and late, respectively. In addition to the two satellites that Orbital immediately began constructing, the contract gave SES Americom the option to order up to three more identical satellites over the next few years after.

The AMC-5R and the identical ground spare spacecraft were hybrid satellites, each carrying 24 active C-band and 24 Ku-band transponders of 36MHz capacity each. Some of the channels in each band would also be cross-strapped, enabling new service capability. Each spacecraft would generate approximately 5kW of payload power and would have two deployable reflectors.

SES Americom announced in April the order of a third spacecraft under the multi-satellite contract both companies announced in May Under this contract, the earlier ordered ground spare became AMC-4R (originally designated AMC-1R), and a new ground spare will be produced for a future use.

In early , the satellites were renamed from AMC-4R, AMC-5R and AMC ground spare to SES-1, SES-2 and SES-3 respectively.

SES-1 was launched on April 24th, , on a Proton M booster rocket operated by launch operator ILS from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

 

SES-1 North America C-band Beam M
SES-1 North America C-band Beam M
SES-1 North America Ku-band Beam M
SES-1 North America Ku-band Beam M
Sours: https://sky-brokers.com/satellite/sesamc-4r-atwest/
Journey to Space 1: SES in Luxembourg - Satellites at their fingertips

SES 1, 2, 3

SES 1 [OSC]

SES 2 (with CHIRP experiment) [OSC]

Orbital Sciences Corporation announced in May that it has received an order from SES AMERICOM for as many as five new satellites over a multi-year period. Orbital stated that SES AMERICOM has placed a firm order for two new satellites, the first designated as AMC-5R and the second a ground spare that was launched to another orbital location as a replacement satellite.

Deliveries of the first two satellites are scheduled for mid- and late, respectively. In addition to the two satellites that Orbital will immediately begin constructing, the contract gives SES AMERICOM the option to order up to three more identical satellites over the next few years.

The AMC-5R and the identical ground spare spacecraft will be hybrid satellites, each carrying 24 active C-band and 24 Ku-band transponders of 36 MHz capacity each. Some of the channels in each band will also be cross-strapped, enabling new service capability. Each spacecraft will generate approximately five kilowatts of payload power and will have two deployable reflectors.

SES AMERICOM announced in April the order of a third spacecraft under the multi-satellite contract both companies announced in May Under this contract, the earlier ordered ground spare will now become AMC-4R (originally designated AMC-1R), and a new ground spare will be produced for a future use.

Planned for launch in the second half of on a Zenit-3SLB, AMC-1R will have a permanent home in geosynchronous Earth orbit at  degrees West longitude.

AMERICOM Government Services (AGS) announced in June that it has been awarded a contract by the U.S. Air Force to host an experimental sensor on board of AMC 5R (SES 2). The primary purpose of the CHIRP (Commercially Hosted Infrared Payload) experiment is to test a new type of infrared sensor from geo-synchronous altitude. The passive infrared sensor will be integrated onto the SES-2 satellite so that it can be launched into orbit and the data can then be transmitted to the ground for analysis.

In early , the satellites were renamed from AMC 4R, AMC 5R and AMC ground spare to SES 1, 2 and 3 respectively.

SES 1 was configured for direct GEO insertion by the Proton-M Briz-M launch vehicle and therefore omitting the apogee engine and the oxidizer.

Nation:USA
Type / Application:Communication
Operator:SES Americom → SES World Skies
Contractors:Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC)
Equipment:24 active C-band, 24 Ku-band and 2 Ka-band transponders; CHIRP (#2 only)
Configuration:Star Bus
Propulsion:IHI BT-4 (#2, 3)
Power:2 deployable solar arrays, batteries
Lifetime:15 years (fueled for >16 years)
Mass: kg (#1); kg (#2); kg (#3)
Orbit:GEO
Further GE / AMC / AAP missions:
  • GE 1, 2, 3 → AMC 1, 2, 3 [AA]
  • GE 5 → AMC 5 [Spacebus]
  • GE 1E [SpacebusB2]
  • GE 1A → AAP 1 [AAX]
  • GE 4, 6 → AMC 4, 6 [AAX]
  • GE 7, 8 → AMC 7, 8, 10, 11, 18 [AA]
  • AMC 4R, 5R [Star-2]
  • AMC 9, 17 [SpacebusB3]
  • AMC 12, 22 [SpacebusC3]
  • AMC 13, 23 [SpacebusC3]
  • AMC 14 [AAXS]
  • AMC 15, 16 [AAXS]
  • AMC 21 [Star-2]
  • AMC 23 [SpacebusC3]
Sours: https://space.skyrocket.de/doc_sdat/seshtm

Satellite ses 1

Proton Lofts SES-1 Satellite Into Orbit from Kazakhstan

PARIS — An International Launch Services (ILS) Proton rocket on April 25 successfully placed the SES-1 telecommunications satellite into a near-geostationary orbit about nine hours after liftoff from the Russian-run Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. The satellite’s owner, SES of Luxembourg, said it had acquired signals that the satellite was healthy following separation from Proton’s Breeze-M upper stage.

SES-1, built by Orbital Sciences Corp. of Dulles, Va., will be moved into final geostationary orbit about 36, kilometers above the equator in the coming weeks and is expected to be ready for operations by SES by late May.

The satellite, formerly known as AMC-4R, will operate at SES World Skies’ degrees west orbital slot covering North America and will replace the AMC-2 and AMC-4 spacecraft there now. SES-1 uses Orbital’s Star E platform and carries 24 C- band and 24 Ku-band transponders.

SES, which has entered into multi-satellite launch contracts with Reston, Va.-based ILS and with the Arianespace consortium of Europe, contracted with Orbital for three nearly identical satellites, with an option for two more.

SES-1 weighed 2, kilograms at launch, making it a light load for the Proton-Breeze-M, which can lift satellites weighing more than 6, kilograms into geostationary transfer position.

The light weight of the satellite permitted the Proton to drop off SES-1 into a circular equatorial orbit less than 2, kilometers below the geostationary arc, which is the destination of most communications satellites. That permitted SES-1 to use less of its own on-board fuel to reach its final orbit than it would have had it been released in the typical geostationary transfer orbit, resulting in an estimated service life of 16 years rather than the standard 15 years.

SES-1 uses the same basic Star-2 platform design used by the Intelsat Galaxy 15 satellite that lost communications with ground teams in April. Orbital officials said the most probable cause is the intense solar storms that occurred in the first week of April.

SES Chief Executive Romain Bausch said SES continued with its launch without waiting for the Galaxy 15 anomaly-review board’s final conclusions because SES-1 includes backup systems that are not on board Galaxy

The launch was the 22nd Proton flight in 21 months and the third mission for ILS — which sells Proton on the commercial market — this year. The company has said it hopes to conduct seven to eight commercial launches in after seven in

Launch MissionsProtonSatellite

Sours: https://spacenews.com/proton-lofts-sessatellite-orbit-kazakhstan/
SES Satellites: A Users Manual No.1 - History

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