Eero 6 pro

Eero 6 pro DEFAULT

Amazon eero Pro 6 tri-band mesh Wi-Fi 6 router with built-in Zigbee smart home hub

Speed, reliability, and security - with advanced technology at its core, eero blankets your home with Wi-Fi you can count on.

Tech Specs


Quick Specs


Device Type

Wireless router

Data Link Protocol

Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, IEEE 802.11b, IEEE 802.11a, IEEE 802.11g, IEEE 802.11n, ZigBee, IEEE 802.11ac, IEEE 802.11ax

Frequency Band

2.4 GHz / 5 GHz

Power

AC 120/230 V (50/60 Hz)

Dimensions (WxDxH)

5.3 in x 5.3 in x 2.1 in

Manufacturer Warranty

1-year warranty

Device Type

Wireless router

Data Link Protocol

Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, IEEE 802.11b, IEEE 802.11a, IEEE 802.11g, IEEE 802.11n, ZigBee, IEEE 802.11ac, IEEE 802.11ax

Frequency Band

2.4 GHz / 5 GHz

Power

AC 120/230 V (50/60 Hz)

Dimensions (WxDxH)

5.3 in x 5.3 in x 2.1 in

Manufacturer Warranty

1-year warranty

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General


Device Type

Wireless router

Connectivity Technology

Wireless, wired

Data Link Protocol

Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, IEEE 802.11b, IEEE 802.11a, IEEE 802.11g, IEEE 802.11n, ZigBee, IEEE 802.11ac, IEEE 802.11ax

Frequency Band

2.4 GHz / 5 GHz

Encryption Algorithm

WPA2, WPA3

Expansion / Connectivity


Interfaces

WAN / LAN: 2 x 1000Base-T - RJ-45

Power


Power Device

External power adapter - 15 Watt

Voltage Required

AC 120/230 V (50/60 Hz)

Dimensions & Weight


Manufacturer Warranty


Service & Support

Limited warranty - 1 year

Environmental Parameters


Min Operating Temperature

32 °F

Max Operating Temperature

104 °F

General


Device Type

Wireless router

Connectivity Technology

Wireless, wired

Data Link Protocol

Ethernet, Fast Ethernet, Gigabit Ethernet, IEEE 802.11b, IEEE 802.11a, IEEE 802.11g, IEEE 802.11n, ZigBee, IEEE 802.11ac, IEEE 802.11ax

Frequency Band

2.4 GHz / 5 GHz

Encryption Algorithm

WPA2, WPA3

Expansion / Connectivity


Interfaces

WAN / LAN: 2 x 1000Base-T - RJ-45

Power


Power Device

External power adapter - 15 Watt

Voltage Required

AC 120/230 V (50/60 Hz)

Dimensions & Weight


Manufacturer Warranty


Service & Support

Limited warranty - 1 year

Environmental Parameters


Min Operating Temperature

32 °F

Max Operating Temperature

104 °F

Drivers, Manuals & Support


Drivers, Manuals & Support

Dell Support

From drivers and manuals to diagnostic tools and replacement parts, Dell Product Support has you covered!

Get Started

Sours: https://www.dell.com/en-us/shop/amazon-eero-pro-6-tri-band-mesh-wi-fi-6-router-with-built-in-zigbee-smart-home-hub/apd/ab388493/networking
eero-6

Amazon's fall product launch included a pair of new mesh routers this year. Called the Eero 6 and Eero Pro 6, respectively, the two new systems add in full support for Wi-Fi 6, and they also add in a new Zigbee radio that lets Alexa users pair with things like smart lights and smart locks without need for additional hub hardware.

Like all mesh routers, Eero systems use multiple devices to spread a stronger Wi-Fi signal throughout your home. You'll connect the main router to your modem just like a normal router, then you'll plug in the identical-looking satellite devices in other parts of your home where you want to boost the connection. Ideally, the result is a larger, more robust Wi-Fi network with fewer dead zones. 

Like

  • Easy setup
  • Strong top speeds
  • Stable, reliable performance
  • Zigbee radio helps you connect devices with Alexa.

Don't Like

  • Relatively few Ethernet ports for things like hubs and streaming devices.
  • App lacks advanced features.

Whereas the Eero 6 is an entry-level Wi-Fi 6 system that struggled in some of our tests, the Eero Pro 6 is a higher-end design that delivered faster speeds and better performance as we tested it out. The key "Pro" feature is the triband design, which gives the mesh an additional 5GHz band for dedicated system transmissions. That frees up the first 5GHz band for your normal traffic and makes a noticeable impact in your network performance -- and it helps a mesh system like this one make full use of Wi-Fi 6.

At $229 (£179) for a single Eero Pro 6 router or $599 (£429) for a three-pack with the router and two extenders, the Eero Pro 6 definitely isn't cheap. (Though the three-pack is discounted to $479 at time of writing.) Still, it's a better value than most other triband mesh routers that support Wi-Fi 6 -- for comparison, the top-performing Netgear Orbi AX6000 costs $1,000 for a three-pack. 

That makes the Eero Pro 6 a surprising value pick relative to systems like those, and the strong performance keeps it from feeling like you're compromising. If you live in a large home and you want fast coverage from room to room, then a robust mesh system with multiple extenders is what you need. The Eero Pro 6 gets you there for less than the competition, and that makes it an easy system to recommend, so much so that we awarded it our Editors' Choice designation for mesh routers.

img-5814

Hands-on with the Eero Pro 6

Amazon says that the regular Eero 6 system is designed for homes with internet speeds of up to 500 megabits per second, while the faster Eero Pro 6 system is built to take advantage of gigabit speeds, complete with a tri-band design that features an extra 5GHz band to keep network transmissions between Eero devices separate from your regular internet traffic. That's a big difference when it comes to mesh networking, especially when you're connecting at range -- and it's also a feature that pairs particularly well with Wi-Fi 6. Even if none of your own devices support the new, faster Wi-Fi standard, they'll still benefit from your Eero devices slinging data across the mesh faster and more efficiently.

The hardware checked out when we took the Eero Pro 6 to our lab to run some controlled top speed tests. With the router wired to a server PC, we were able to use the Eero network to pull data wirelessly to a client PC at speeds of up to 1,008Mbps from 5 feet away, just over gigabit speeds. For comparison, most of the triband mesh routers we've tested over the past year have topped out at around 900Mbps in our lab, including the AX6000 version of Netgear Orbi, the Asus ZenWiFi AX, and the Amplifi Alien.

At a distance of 37.5 feet, the Eero Pro 6's top transfer rate of 1,008Mbps fell slightly to 922Mbps, and at 75 feet, it had only dropped to 838Mbps. That means that the wireless speeds at 75 feet were about 83% as fast as the wireless speeds at 5 feet. That's a great result, and the strongest "range ratio" we've ever seen from a mesh router in this test.

I also put the Eero Pro 6 to the test while working at home here in Louisville, Kentucky. My place is a smallish, shotgun-style house of about 1,300 square feet, and my AT&T fiber internet connection sits at 300Mbps. A system like the Eero Pro 6 is probably overkill for a space like this -- especially the Eero Pro 6 three-pack that Amazon sent my way -- but I still wanted to get a good look at how the system compared with some of the best mesh routers we've tested, including Nest Wifi, the AX6000 version of Netgear Orbi and the Asus ZenWiFi AX.

Setting the system up was a cinch, thanks to the Eero app, which walks you through the process with clear, simple instructions and helpful guidance on how to pick the best spots for your devices. Plug the Eero Pro 6 into your modem, press "go" in the app and you'll be up and running within minutes.

img-5808

From there, the app lets you see the devices on your network, and it can notify you if something new joins. You can also group devices into profiles with their own specific rules for things like parental controls and timed access (and yes, that also means that you can holler at Alexa to turn off the kids' Wi-Fi when they're misbehaving). For $3 per month, you can add in ad blocking and advanced content filtering with an Eero Secure subscription -- make that $10 per month if you want to add encrypt.me VPN access, Malwarebytes antivirus protection for Mac and Windows and a subscription to 1Password, one of our favorite password managers.

Unlike the Eero 6, where the router and range-extending satellites are two separate pieces of hardware, the Eero Pro 6 devices are all interchangeable, so any one of them can serve as the main router. The system is also backward compatible with earlier-gen Eero routers and range extenders, though I haven't yet had a chance to see how the system performs when you add legacy hardware into the mix. I just wish the Eero Pro 6 devices featured more than two Ethernet jacks on the back. If you're like me, you'll need at least a few more than that to handle wired connections to your various smart home hubs, media streamers and the like.

Features aside, I was eager to start running speed tests. I use the same methodology with every router I test, running several speed tests at a time in various spots in my home, starting in the same room as the router and ending in my back bathroom, the farthest spot from the router. Then, I repeat all of that, but backward -- I start with a fresh connection in that back bathroom and work my way back toward the router. I run that entire process multiple times across multiple days -- in the morning, in the afternoon, in the evening, you name it.

The end result is a big, scary spreadsheet filled with more than a hundred speed test results and average download speeds for each room I test in. With one Eero Pro 6 device plugged into the modem in my living room and a second device situated in my master bedroom -- the same two-piece approach I use with all of the mesh routers I test -- the speeds were certainly swift, averaging out to about 251Mbps across the entire home. That's better than Nest Wifi, which averaged out to about 222Mbps, but it's a bit short of the Asus ZenWiFi AX and the Netgear Orbi AX6000, which registered whole-home averages of 272 and 289Mbps, respectively.

That lines up with how these systems are priced. The AX600 version of Netgear Orbi is expensive at $700 for a two-piece system, or $1,000 for a three-pack; meanwhile, the two-piece Asus ZenWiFi AX system costs $450, with a third device adding an extra $250 to the cost. At $600 for a three-piece system, the Eero Pro 6 sits as a high-end value pick for large homes since it's one of the most affordable ways to get a tri-band Wi-Fi 6 mesh router with two satellites under your roof. Meanwhile, at $269 for a two-piece setup or $349 for a three-piece setup, Nest Wifi retains a lot of value of its own, though it isn't a tri-band system and it doesn't support Wi-Fi 6.

Digging a little deeper into the data, I was pleased to see that the Eero Pro 6 system didn't drop my connection at any point during my tests -- it offers a satisfying level of reliability and predictability. My speeds dipped a bit as I moved through the back of my house, where the system needed to route my connection through the satellite, but those dips were consistent and barely noticeable. 

When I got rid of the satellites and reran my tests with just one Eero Pro 6 router and no mesh at all, my average speeds dipped more noticeably in that back bathroom, but still stayed up above 80Mbps, which is a pretty good result. Speeds everywhere else remained close to my home's speed limit of 300Mbps, and the overall average rang in at 259Mbps -- slightly faster than the average when I used two Eero Pro 6 devices. 

That might seem counterintuitive, but it's because the two-piece setup was cautious. It routed my connection through the satellite in places like my hallway bathroom and master bedroom where it could have gotten away with just connecting directly to the main router.

The key is that back bathroom -- with a single Eero Pro 6, the average speed in there was 88Mbps. With two Eero Pro 6 devices, that average jumped to 200Mbps. That tells you the system is working as intended, and boosting speeds in places where it'd be difficult to connect with a single standalone router. A slight speed reduction in rooms adjacent to dead zones like that is a fair tradeoff for whole-home coverage.

Meanwhile, Eero's lag performance was excellent, with only one spike of more than 25ms across all of my tests. That's noticeably less lag than I've seen from any of our top mesh router picks, and a great result to see from a brand-new system.

One last note: I run these tests on a Dell XPS laptop that doesn't support Wi-Fi 6 in order to get a good, real-world sense of speeds, and also to serve as a contrast to our lab-based top speed tests, where we use Wi-Fi 6 devices to get a complete look at each router's capabilities in an ideal setting. If you're using Wi-Fi 6 devices like those in your home, then your speeds will likely be a bit faster than mine.

How much faster? To find out, I repeated my laps around the house yet again -- but this time, I ran my speed tests on an iPhone 12 Pro, one of a growing number of devices that boast full support for Wi-Fi 6. My results were, indeed, faster -- specifically, about 20% faster than I saw on the laptop when I was near the main router, and up to 35% faster when I was connecting at range, through the satellite.

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The verdict: It's worth it to go Pro

With strong performance and no unpleasant surprises during my tests, the Eero Pro 6 fits the bill as an upgrade pick, thanks to the triband design and its full support for Wi-Fi 6. It's expensive at $229 for a single router or $599 for a three-pack -- but those prices are lower than you'll pay for comparable systems like the Netgear Orbi AX6000 and the Asus ZenWiFi AX. The Eero Pro 6 held its own with routers like those throughout our tests, and it doesn't feel like much of a compromise compared with any of them, all of which combined give ample justification to its Editors' Choice selection.

Also of note: While the Eero Pro 6 performed well when we tested it out, the same can't be said of the regular Eero 6 system, which saw its speeds suffer from poor band-steering. The Eero Pro 6 seemed to handle band-steering much better, perhaps because of the triband design. For my money, that makes the Eero Pro 6 the much better buy of the two, and a strong choice for home networking overall, especially if you live in a large home that would benefit from a three-piece setup with faster Wi-Fi 6 speeds.

Sours: https://www.cnet.com/home/internet/eero-pro-6-review-amazon-new-wi-fi-6-tri-band-mesh-router/
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Wi-Fi 6

eero Pro 6

eero Pro 6

Covers up to: 6,000 sq. ft.

Best for: Larger homes

$599

Shop all eero Pro 6

  • Gigabit

    Experience speeds up to a gigabit on this mesh wifi system.

  • Wi-Fi 6

    Wi-Fi 6 brings fast connectivity to every room in your home.

  • Tri-band

    Enough bandwidth to support high speeds for 75+ connected devices.

  • 30-day guarantee

    30-day guarantee

  • World-class support

    Free support

  • Free shipping

    Free shipping

  • 1-year warranty

    1-year warranty

“I'm getting faster speeds than I got before. eero works and covers all areas of the home.”

- Cody

“High performance, set it and forget it with advanced security and stability.”

- Christian

Unlock your wifi’s potential.

eero Pro 6 features a built-in Zigbee smart home hub, making it easy to connect compatible devices with Alexa. So you can control certain lights, locks, plugs, and more—without the need to buy separate smart home hubs for each.

Learn More

Never worry about wifi again.

Fast and easy setup
Unbox your eero devices, download the app, and start surfing the web in minutes. The eero app makes it easy to set up and manage wifi for everyone at home.

CHECK OUT THE APP

Advanced network protection
Every eero comes with world-class encryption and security protocols. Add on eero Secure to get even more protection with parental controls, ad blocking, and more.

GET EERO SECURE

Always getting better
eero automatically updates to bring you security patches, improved performance, and new features.

READ ABOUT EERO UPDATES
  • What is Zigbee smart home hub?

    The eero 6 systems are equipped with a built-in Zigbee smart home hub, eliminating the need for additional Zigbee hubs around the home. Featuring a built-in Zigbee smart home hub, the eero 6 systems connect compatible devices on your network with Alexa so you don’t need a separate Zigbee smart home hub for each device. You will need to link your eero and Amazon accounts to use this feature.

  • What is Wi-Fi 6?

    Wi-Fi 6 is the latest wifi technology delivering faster speeds, higher performance, and better support for simultaneous device usage throughout the home.

  • What mesh technology does eero use?

    eero uses our TrueMesh technology. TrueMesh ensures every eero connects wirelessly to every other eero in range, on both the 2.4 GHz and the 5GHz wifi bands. This creates a dense network of connections and many possible paths for traffic to flow. So when wireless interference from the neighbor’s baby monitor, heavy gaming traffic in the family room, or someone closing a metal door in the kitchen, your network is less likely to come to a crawl.

  • Will the new eero 6 systems work with my existing non-Wi-Fi 6 compatible devices?

    Yes, both eero 6 and eero Pro 6 are backward compatible with most wifi devices, making it easy to expand or upgrade existing networks. We do extensive and ongoing testing to ensure backward compatibility for older customer devices.

Wifi connectivity

Tri-band wifi radios, simultaneous 2.4 GHz & 5 GHz Lo & 5 GHz Hi; 2x2/2x2/4x4 MU/SU-MIMO; WMM, Tx Beamforming, OFDMA; Wi-Fi 6 (IEEE802.11a/b/g/n/ac/ax)

Wired connectivity

Dual auto-sensing gigabit ports for WAN and/or LAN connectivity

Smart home connectivity

Zigbee Smart Home Hub, Works with Alexa, Amazon Frustration-Free setup, Bluetooth Low Energy 5.0

Processor, memory, and storage

1.4 GHz quad-core processor, 1024MB RAM, 4GB flash storage

Security and network services

WPA2-AES, WPA3-Personal transition mode, Parental Controls

Required for setup

Supported iOS or Android device, internet service (with cable or DSL modem, if required)

Requirements

Operating: 0°C to 40°C (32°F to 104°F); Electrical: 100-240V AC, 50-60 Hz; Power supply: 27W external

Dimensions

139 x 139 x 52.6 mm (5.5 x 5.5 x 2.1 inch)
Actual size may vary by manufacturing process.

Works With Alexa only available in select countries. Some features require linking your Amazon account or downloading the Alexa application. Internet connection speeds depend on your internet service provider. Maximum wireless signal rates are derived from IEEE standard 802.11 specifications. Experienced speeds may vary based on network configuration. Coverage estimates are based on normal use conditions. Actual range and performance can vary, including due to factors such as interference, device usage, building materials, and obstructions. Throughput and coverage estimates are a configuration reference, not a performance guarantee.

Which eero is right for you?

eero Pro 6

Tri-band Wi-Fi 6 supports speeds up to a gigabit with coverage up to 6,000 sq. ft.

Wireless network speed
Speeds up to a gigabit

Coverage
Up to 6,000 sq. ft.

Wifi protocol
Wi-Fi 6

Connectivity
Tri-band 2.4GHz and 5GHz

Ethernet ports
Two Ethernet ports

Device compatibility
75+ devices simultaneously

Smart home
Control compatible devices with the built-in smart home hub and Alexa app.

+

eero 6

Dual-band Wi-Fi 6 supports speeds up to 500 Mbps with coverage up to 5,000 sq. ft.

Wireless network speed
Speeds up to 500 Mbps

Coverage
Up to 5,000 sq. ft.

Wifi protocol
Wi-Fi 6

Connectivity
Dual-band 2.4GHz and 5GHz

Ethernet ports
Two Ethernet ports

Device compatibility
75+ devices simultaneously

Smart home
Control compatible devices with the built-in smart home hub and Alexa app.

+

eero product shots

eero

Dual-band Wi-Fi 5 supports speeds up to 350 Mbps with coverage up to 5,000 sq. ft.

Wireless network speed
Speeds up to 350 Mbps

Coverage
Up to 5,000 sq. ft.

Wifi protocol
Wi-Fi 5

Connectivity
Dual-band 2.4GHz and 5GHz

Ethernet ports
Two Ethernet ports

Device compatibility
50+ devices simultaneously

+

COMPARE MODELS

Sours: https://eero.com/shop/eero-pro-6
Best Wifi Router - Netgear Orbi Wifi 6, Eero Pro 6, Asus Zenwifi AX

Eero Pro 6 review: less pro than expected

Eero was the company that first popularized mesh networking for the home, fixing Wi-Fi for millions. It has built a reputation for its simple setup and minimal maintenance, reliably broadcasting a Wi-Fi connection throughout your home much better than a traditional standalone router could. Now that it is owned by Amazon, it promises to repeat that trick for customers who have access to gigabit internet speeds with its top-tier Eero Pro 6.

Fixing most home Wi-Fi problems doesn’t have to cost a lot. A basic mesh system can provide reliable Wi-Fi coverage in most homes without costing more than $250. If the speeds you’re getting from your ISP are 300Mbps or less, there’s no real need to buy anything more.

But if you do have the privilege of access to faster home internet, such as what gigabit fiber can offer, you might want something more. That’s where high-end Wi-Fi 6-enabled mesh systems like the Eero Pro 6 come in. They can spread your fast connection throughout your home without having to deal with pesky wiring and let you take full advantage of the bandwidth you’re forking money over for each month.

Earlier this year, I looked at one of the first Wi-Fi 6 mesh routers to see if it could give me better speeds on my gigabit Fios service than earlier Wi-Fi 5-based systems could. And it did: the Arris Surfboard Max Pro was able to deliver more of the bandwidth I pay for to my devices, even if I wasn’t in the same room as the router. But each Arris node is a massive unit, the app to manage the router is clumsy at best, I ran into some frustrating reliability issues, and it cost $650 at the time of my review.

The $599 Eero Pro 6 I’ve been testing, on the other hand, is compact, reliable, and just as easy to set up as Eero’s lower-tier models. But unfortunately, it doesn’t bring the performance that justifies its price tag.

Our review of Eero Pro 6

Verge Score6.5 out of 10

Good Stuff

  • Compact size
  • Easy setup
  • Great coverage
  • Solid stability

Bad Stuff

  • It’s expensive
  • Parental controls are locked behind a paid subscription
  • Speeds are only slightly faster than Wi-Fi 5 systems
  • Few advanced features and limited control options
  • Just two Ethernet ports on each node

Buy for $599.00 from AmazonBuy for $599.00 from Best Buy

Eero Pro 6 pricing

The Eero Pro 6 system that I tested is the top-tier package, which includes three nodes and sells for $599 (though it’s been marked down to as low as $480 during the holiday shopping season). Eero also sells single units for $229 each or a two-pack for $399.

These pricing details are important because, frankly, every tri-band Wi-Fi 6 mesh system is expensive, and Eero is no exception. Compared to Eero’s prior-generation Pro model, the Eero Pro 6 is 20 percent more costly. It is also a lot more expensive than Eero’s non-“Pro” lineup, which starts at just $249 for a Wi-Fi 5-based system with three nodes (and can frequently be found for a lot less). Eero’s entry-level Wi-Fi 6 mesh systems are similarly approachable at $279 for a three-pack.

How many nodes you require depends on the size and layout of your home. Eero claims each unit covers up to 2,000 square feet, but that’s in a perfect scenario, which your home most certainly is not. My test environment is a 2,100-square-foot split-level home built in the 1960s, with the internet connection coming in on the middle floor. I placed the other two nodes on the lower and upper floors, where my home office and the bedrooms are. The Eero Pro 6 system allows for hard-wiring each node together, which you can’t do with the base Eero 6, but my home is not wired up to support this, so I have to rely on wireless connections.

Eero is not alone in charging a premium for a tri-band Wi-Fi 6 based system targeted at those with gigabit internet service. As mentioned, the Arris system I tested earlier this year is $650, while Netgear, Linksys, and others all have options in the $500 to $700 range and sometimes even more.

If you’re going to pay more for faster speeds, you damn well better get them. You should be able to get the majority of your gigabit bandwidth throughout your home. After all, that’s the whole point of a mesh system. And if you’re thinking of upgrading from a Wi-Fi 5 mesh system, you should see a measurable increase in speeds to your devices. Basically, any mesh system on the market can blanket thousands of square feet with a strong wireless signal and support dozens of simultaneously connected devices. What you’re paying for here is the speed.

Eero Pro 6 performance

Unfortunately, speed is where the Eero Pro 6 disappoints the most.

I tested the Eero Pro 6 using gigabit Verizon Fios service and compared its performance to the Wi-Fi 5 Eero Pro, Linksys’ Velop MX4200, and the Arris Surfboard Max Pro AX11000 I reviewed previously. As this is a live home network (aka not a lab) and I have a lot of connected devices, there are anywhere from 60 to 70 devices on the network at the same time, of which half a dozen or so actually support Wi-Fi 6.

The Eero Pro 6 did perform slightly better than the Wi-Fi 5 version, but not significantly so. On average, speeds to my devices were about 10 to 15 percent better than the Wi-Fi 5 Eero Pro, averaging 300Mbps no matter how close to the router I was. Frustratingly, many times, my smaller Wi-Fi 6 devices, such as phones and tablets, couldn’t hit more than 200Mbps down, though they were able to double that speed on uploads.

A note on Wi-Fi 6 itself: Wi-Fi 6 brings a long list of advancements to wireless networking, including support for many more connected devices on a single network, faster theoretical top speeds, and improved battery life on devices connected to a Wi-Fi 6 network. To take advantage of many of the features, such as the improved battery life and faster top speeds, you need to be using a Wi-Fi 6 device, such as a very recent smartphone or laptop.

Wi-Fi 6 is specifically designed to address the changing dynamics of home networks where more and more devices are connected at the same time. But to get that improved network management and reliability, every device that’s connected needs to be Wi-Fi 6. (Wi-Fi 6 is backwards compatible with the older Wi-Fi 4 and Wi-Fi 5 technologies, so everything you currently have will connect to it just fine.) That isn’t to say using a Wi-Fi 5 device on a Wi-Fi 6 network will ruin the experience, but you won’t get the full benefit of everything Wi-Fi 6 has to offer until all of your devices are updated to support it. For more detail on what Wi-Fi 6 brings to the table, go read my colleague Jake Kastrenakes’ breakdown of it here.

What Wi-Fi 6 offers right now is the ability for the nodes of a mesh network to send data to the main router faster than what was available over Wi-Fi 5. Those speeds can then be sent directly to your smartphone, laptop, or gaming console that’s connected to a nearby mesh node, even if those devices aren’t using Wi-Fi 6 themselves. You can get even faster speeds if you connect your computer or console to the mesh node with an Ethernet cable, even if you are a few rooms away from where the internet connection comes into your home, an ideal benefit if your home isn’t wired up for networking, such as mine.

With a desktop computer hardwired into one of the secondary Pro 6 nodes (which then uses a Wi-Fi connection to link to the main router a floor above), I was able to get download speeds above 400Mbps and sometimes up to 500Mbps, or about half of my available bandwidth. That’s a good 100 to 200Mbps faster than I typically saw from the Eero Pro 5 system, but still makes a lot of my bandwidth inaccessible. Again, upload speeds were much stronger, but when you’re downloading a massive AAA game and just want to get playing, fast upload speeds are a small consolation.

The Linksys Velop MX4200, which has similar specs to the Eero Pro, performed almost identically, with speeds capping out at just over 300Mbps and most smaller devices not pulling more than 200Mbps down. That’s not enough of a difference for me to recommend spending $500 or $600 to upgrade from a Wi-Fi 5-based mesh system if you already have one.

The Arris’ more complex antenna array did provide a significant speed bump over Wi-Fi 5 systems and both the Eero Pro 6 and Linksys units. My mobile devices were consistently able to achieve connection speeds over 400Mbps, while hardwiring into the remote node allowed me to see near gigabit downloads.

Though the Eero disappointed me on actual speeds, it proved very reliable, with great stability throughout my weeks of testing. It hops devices from one node to another well as I move around the house, and it’s able to handle the load of remote working and schooling that often includes multiple concurrent video calls without dropping connections or choking. 4K video streams are possible anywhere in my home, and I never had to worry about what my kids were doing on the network if I needed to make a critical video call or upload a large file for work. It bested the Arris in this respect, which often needed to be rebooted to get its mesh node to reconnect to the main router and had trouble roaming devices from one node to the other as I moved through the house.

But I was able to get that same kind of reliability with the older Wi-Fi 5 system and the same internet service, so you don’t need to buy an Eero Pro 6 setup to experience it.

My test results are far from scientific. I’m testing in a single home with a single service and using internet connection speeds averaged across a variety of speed test services as a metric, which network administrators would turn their nose up at. But while some folks might be more concerned with how fast they can shuffle files around their home network, the vast majority of people just want to have a fast connection to the internet no matter where they are in their home. It’s why you’re paying for a gigabit internet connection to begin with. Dong Ngo’s testing over at DongKnows shows that in file transfer scenarios, the Eero Pro 6 sits about middle of the pack, despite its top-shelf pricing. Numerous user reports on Reddit also complain about modest to no internet speed increases over Wi-Fi 5-based systems.

During my test period, the Eero Pro 6 system received a handful of software updates (which are delivered automatically; there’s no way to force an update), including a recent update to version 6.1. Some users have reported noticeable speed increases with the 6.1 update, but after redoing a number of tests, the speeds on my network have remained consistent with earlier software versions, with the most noticeable improvement seen when I am hardwired into a mesh node.

Eero Pro 6 design

Something that the Eero Pro 6 has over all of its Wi-Fi 6 competition is aesthetics. The Eero Pro 6 node is so much smaller than any other tri-band system, which makes it easier to place in your home and doesn’t stick out like a sore thumb if you do have to keep it in a living area. It’s a little larger than the old Eero Pro and certainly not as discreet as the Eero Beacon, but it’s tiny compared to the high-end Wi-Fi 6 routers from Netgear, Linksys, and Arris.

Another feature that sets Eero apart from most of the other Wi-Fi 6 mesh systems is you can mix and match the new Wi-Fi 6 units with older Wi-Fi 5 nodes. If you already own an Eero system and don’t want to wholly replace every unit, buying one or two nodes and integrating them into your existing network could be an appealing option, though you will only get the benefits of Wi-Fi 6 when you’re connected to one of the new nodes, which you can’t always predict or rely on.

You give up some things, though. Just like the older Eero Pro, the Pro 6 has just two Ethernet ports on the back, one of which will be occupied by the cable coming from your modem. If you have any number of devices that you plan to hardwire into the router, you’ll definitely need to get a multiport switch. There is no way to hook up a storage drive directly to the Pro 6, either, as its lone USB-C port is used for its power adapter.

There’s just one LED light on the front of the Eero. It glows blue during setup, is a static white when everything is working as it should, and glows red when there isn’t an internet connection. For any more detail than that, you’ll have to go to the Eero app.

The Eero Pro 6 is rated as an AX4200 system, which is an obtuse way of describing what its peak networking speeds are. That rating puts it in the middle of the pack of tri-band Wi-Fi 6 mesh systems: it’s the same as Linksys’ $499 Velop MX4200 but lower than the AX6600 and AX11000 systems from Netgear and Arris.

As this is a tri-band system, the Eero Pro 6 supports three Wi-Fi bands: the standard 2.4GHz and 5GHz ones most Wi-Fi routers offer, plus another 5GHz band to allow the nodes to send data back and forth without competing with your device traffic. Unlike other systems, which separate device traffic and mesh node traffic between the two 5GHz bands, Eero’s system will just use whatever lane it determines is the most efficient, so it doesn’t have a “dedicated backhaul” band that others advertise. In theory, the two 5GHz bands should provide enough bandwidth for gigabit speeds to your devices, though one of them has half as many antennas as the other, which does have an impact on throughput. That’s why Eero’s AX4200 rating is lower than others, which offer more antennas.

In addition to its Wi-Fi radios, the Eero Pro 6 has Thread and Zigbee smart home radio support, so you can use it as a hub for smart home devices, which are then managed through the Alexa app.

Eero Pro 6 app and setup

Setting up the Eero Pro 6 is just as easy and straightforward as the company’s prior models. You download the app to your phone, plug in the first node, and follow the prompts. The app walks you through adding the additional nodes, creating your network and password, and turning on features such as a guest network or Eero’s subscription-based security and parental control features.

Unfortunately, the app is the only way to manage the network. Eero doesn’t offer any web interface at all, and using the app requires you to create an Eero account and have an active internet connection on your phone before you set up the network. This is becoming a popular trend among mesh systems — both Arris and Google’s systems work the same way — but Eero was arguably the first to popularize an app-only experience.

The Eero app is also surprisingly limited, especially for a high-end system that’s ostensibly designed for power users. It offers very few network management controls, lacks things like Dynamic DNS, and doesn’t let you separate out the 2.4GHz network from the 5GHz one for greater transparency. It displays a list of all of my connected devices, but it does a poor job of automatically identifying them, so I had to go in and manually figure out which one was which through its IP address before I could apply parental controls or other filters to it. (Eero is not alone in this issue, every other router management app I’ve used struggles with it as well.)

Most of these limitations are easy to ignore on entry-level mesh systems where the main thing that matters is reliable coverage. And Eero would likely argue that its algorithms are more effective at managing network load than the average person futzing with settings. Most people just want to turn the thing on and have it work. But on a $600 system that’s advertised for gigabit home internet service and has “Pro” in its name, the hands-off approach is frustrating and limits how much control over your own network you have. As it is, Eero offers the exact same app experience whether you pay $100 for an entry-level node or the full $600 for the top-tier system. It could do well to add more pro features to its “Pro” router.

The Eero Pro 6 does not support Apple HomeKit, even though Eero’s older models do. I asked Eero, and the company said it is working with Apple to get it certified for HomeKit, but there isn’t a specific release date for it. Another option not yet available on the Eero Pro 6 is the toggle for “optimizing for conference and gaming” in the Labs section of the app’s settings. This is the closest thing Eero offers to quality of service management and is designed to prioritize devices that are currently on video calls or playing games. The company says it is working on adding it to the Eero Pro 6 in future updates.

Like its other routers, Eero offers some subscription-based services on the Eero Pro 6. These include ad filtering, malware protection, content filters, and access to paid apps such as Encrypt.me and 1Password. The base Eero Secure plan costs $29.99 per year and includes everything but the paid apps; the Secure Plus plan runs $99 per year and adds those apps in.

I’m hesitant to recommend paying for either of these services, as competing routers offer content filtering and parental controls for free, both of which are table stakes features. The other problem is Eero is not transparent at all about what the threat blocks and security features are actually doing. It just shows you a report of blocks it made on specific devices but doesn’t say anything about what they were or what caused the threats. The ad filtering is also less effective than content blockers on your browser in my experience.

The only way the subscription makes sense is if you were planning to pay for 1Password and Encrypt.me anyway, as the bundle is less expensive than parting them out separately.

Lastly, it’s important to note that Eero is wholly owned by Amazon and that using its routers requires an Eero account. You can further link an Amazon account to your Eero account to make use of Amazon’s Simple Setup features and the built-in Zigbee smart home hub. Eero outlines the data it collects in its privacy policy, and, well, it’s a lot.


Thanks to rapid iteration over the past few years, mesh routers have reached levels of maturity and accessibility that were unthinkable just a short time ago. (Eero’s first model, which arguably broke the door open on mesh Wi-Fi routers, came out in 2016.) That means if a company is going to charge a significant price for a router and claim that it’s ideal for gigabit connections and “pro” uses (whatever that means), it has to really prove that worth with performance.

Unfortunately, based on my experience, the Eero Pro 6 doesn’t bring the performance I’d expect at this price tier. It’s slightly faster than the prior generation, but not nearly enough to make an upgrade worthwhile. And it’s not so much better or faster than the less expensive mesh router options currently available, even ones made by Eero itself. That’s not a huge surprise, as Eero’s older systems were never the fastest in the field, but I was hoping for a bigger jump in performance with the Pro 6 than I’ve seen so far, especially given the price increase.

Eero isn’t alone here. My tests showed Linksys Velop MX4200 doesn’t carry its weight either. And even with the routers that do provide faster speeds, you compromise things like aesthetics, reliability, and features (not to mention having to pay even more). The Arris router brought the performance increases I’m looking for, but it’s bigger, uglier, needs more maintenance, and costs more. Wi-Fi 6 routers are still a new thing, only coming to market in the past year, and it seems like they have a ways to go before they are demonstrably better than their Wi-Fi 5 predecessors in everyday use cases (aka outside of a controlled lab).

If you’re thinking of making an investment and can wait, my recommendation would be to do just that. Wi-Fi 6E, which is the next step in the Wi-Fi technology chain, is expected to arrive in the near future and bring more significant speed and capacity increases. None of today’s routers (or devices) support it yet. But if you are in need of a mesh router right now, you might want to look at options other than the Eero Pro 6.

Photography by Dan Seifert / The Verge

Sours: https://www.theverge.com/22193059/eero-pro-6-review-mesh-router-wifi-6-test-speeds-network

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