06 kenworth t600

06 kenworth t600 DEFAULT

2006 KENWORTH T600

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Mileage: 613,575

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Truck Highlights

Stock
#J149467
Mileage
613,575
Engine
CATERPILLAR C15
Horsepower
475
Application
SLEEPER
Body
CONVENTIONAL
Transmission
18 SPEED AUTO SHIFT
Sleeper Size
86
Wheelbase
250
Suspension
AIR RIDE

2015 PETERBILT 365

$69,950.00

Stock #FD261535Strafford, MO 417.829.6700

Miles:
33,235
Engine:
CUMMINS ISX 12L
Transmission:
8 SPEED MANUAL
Application:
SLEEPER

2012 PETERBILT 367

$74,950.00

Stock #CD137652Strafford, MO 417.829.6700

Miles:
143,000
Engine:
CUMMINS ISX 15L
Transmission:
8 SPEED MANUAL
Application:
SLEEPER

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  1. Hello. new to this forum. Not new to forums in general. I am on here on behalf of my father, he does not know how to work a computer. He has an 06' T600 with a CAT C-15 ACERT engine twin turbos, 13 speed trans, ALL STOCK NO MODS! He uses his truck for local heavy hauls here around the puget sound in WA and often makes trips to portland and further south as well as Boise ID and Billings MT. First and foremost he wants to know if swapping to a larger single turbo would be beneficial, the twins seem to keep his engine oil temp higher then he would like- 240 degrees pulling long hills, like cabbage patch hill in OR. And he has been advised not to install an oil cooler, which i don't understand. How the heck would installing an inline engine oil cooler mess with anything? it wouldn't! Secondly, he's concerned with horsepower, right now it has 500HP. Now this is strange, the engine oil cooled down ALLOT after he had his truck pumped up to 500 HP from 450, it used to stay between 200-220 and jump to 240 sometimes, now it stays between 190-210 and never gets above 220. How does that work? thats all for right now. And thanks in advance for the intelligent replies.
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  3. Switching to single turbo? Sure, if he doesn't mind losing that quicker HP/torque gain from the narrow channels on the dual. Also less maintenance breakdown issues on single screw, and toss in an aging c-15 with dual screws? ehmm...I'd just as soon avoid any cat engine until they get their business straight with the new CT series and completely write off the c15. But it doesn't sound like he has a choice so I would opt for the single.

    Sent you a PM.
  4. Keep the single, if he does anything a PDI tune would be good. The Accert engine is actually a much better set up than the older 6NZ that everyone loves to rave about. I'd just leave it alone. CAT does not manufacture a road engine right now. International does, they are the maxxforce painted yellow, YUCK! I'm not to sure about the cooling, but it seems like those are normal temps.
  5. If keeping the temps down is the main goal I would leave it alone. The temps you mention are normal and the C15 was designed to run in that range, so running it cooler than intended may bring other problems. If I had turbo problems I would switch to a single, if the two are just fine right now then you would be wasting money with no benefit. I agree, the C15 gets a bad rap from the old school it doesn't deserve.
  6. Keep the single, if he does anything a PDI tune would be good. The Accert engine is actually a much better set up than the older 6NZ that everyone loves to rave about. I'd just leave it alone. CAT does not manufacture a road engine right now. International does, they are the maxxforce painted yellow, YUCK! I'm not to sure about the cooling, but it seems like those are normal temps.
    Cat does manufacture class 8 engines again, and their own brand of trucks. They've just branched into regional class 8's and the engine is the CT13 series.


    International no longer produces any maxxforce products, and hasn't for a while, especially since it fell under a class action lawsuit and in the same boat as Cat with it's c15. Though international does still manufacture their duramax engines with the SCR/carb compliance, there's a whole world of difference between an engine expected to pull 40k and one designed to pull 80k and they both have to be close to the same dimensions. It's not quite clear how similar the c15 and maxxforce were to one another since all class 8 engine share many industry standard designs.

    Another quick point is that Cat and INT have partnered and that is clear enough in body design + frame building plus their open countenance towards one another.

    So long as the fan is kicking over at 240/250 everything is cool in the neighborhood, but a single screw would do a better job of preserving that engine.
  7. Cat does manufacture class 8 engines again, and their own brand of trucks. They've just branched into regional class 8's and the engine is the CT13 series.


    International no longer produces any maxxforce products, and hasn't for a while, especially since it fell under a class action lawsuit and in the same boat as Cat with it's c15. Though international does still manufacture their duramax engines with the SCR/carb compliance, there's a whole world of difference between an engine expected to pull 40k and one designed to pull 80k and they both have to be close to the same dimensions. It's not quite clear how similar the c15 and maxxforce were to one another since all class 8 engine share many industry standard designs.

    Another quick point is that Cat and INT have partnered and that is clear enough in body design + frame building plus their open countenance towards one another.

    So long as the fan is kicking over at 240/250 everything is cool in the neighborhood, but a single screw would do a better job of preserving that engine.
    .
    the fan is supposed to cut in at 217. leave the twins alone. seems as if he doesn't have any problems.
  8. thanks guys. Got more questions.....transmission in truck now is the low torque model of 13 speed, eaton fuller and Kenworth does not recommend going above 1650 torque. Thinking about boosting the HP up to 550 which would increase the torque to 1850. Guys at kenworth shop have said they've seen it done on other customers rigs and have not had them complain. Need some feedback on this. Anyone out there have my same truck with the low torque style tranny that has more then 500HP? Ive been doing allot of checking and research and am considering swapping an 18 speed...
  9. You can bump the horsepower to 550 and your current 1650 rated transmission will be fine - just don't be dumping the clutch and popping wheelies. Dealer type places KW, Pete, or CAT will not do that sort of uprate - you'll have to find a private individual who will.
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    Kenworth T600

    Motor vehicle

    The KenworthT600 is a model line of conventional-cab trucks that were produced by the American truck manufacturer Kenworth from 1984 to 2007.[1][2] Distinguished by its aerodynamic sloped hood, the T600 was a Class 8 truck, typically sold in semitractor configuration.

    While aerodynamic devices (such as roof fairings) had been introduced on Class 8 trucks in the mid-1970s, the T600 was the first American semitractor designed from the ground up with aerodynamics and fuel economy in mind.[3] Sharing design commonality with the Class 8 W900, the T600 differs from its counterpart largely with its set-back front axle, hood, and lower bodywork (with the Aerocab later adopted by the W900L).

    For 2008, the T600 model line was replaced by the T660. While sharing the T600 cab structure, the hood and lower bodywork of the T660 were extensively redesigned.

    Background[edit]

    The Kenworth T600 began life as a response to the 1973 oil crisis (which affected diesel prices in a similar manner as gasoline). In 1976, design work commenced on building a semitractor that could reduce aerodynamic drag, thus reducing fuel usage.[1] Due to length restriction laws, truck development originally began on a cabover tractor (similar to a Kenworth K100).[1] In 1980, changes in length regulations allowed from a shift to the K100 to W900, greatly reducing frontal area.

    To enhance the exterior design of the T600, Kenworth/PACCAR engineers experimented with scale models in the wind tunnel of the University of Washington.[4][5] After wind-tunnel testing was completed, T600 prototypes were built using the W900 cab and powertrain as a starting point; the frame and front axle were modified with the T600 design and fitted with the newly designed T600 bodywork.[5] During testing of prototypes at the PACCAR Technical Center, the design of T600 was found to be over 20% more fuel efficient than a W900 with a comparable powertrain.[5][6] At highway speeds with an identical payload as a standard-body conventional, the lower drag of a T600 meant that it required an engine with approximately 100 less horsepower, further increasing fuel economy.[2]

    Following the 1985 unveiling of the T600 at a Kenworth dealer meeting, the T600 earned a strong reaction. Along with dealers and customers highly interested in its innovations and potential fuel savings, other truck drivers and truck spotters nicknamed the T600 "Anteater" (or other names less kind).[1][4] By the end of 1985, the T600 became a success, itself alone accounting for 40% of Kenworth semitractor sales that year.[5][7]

    Model overview[edit]

    Along with its sloped hood, the aerodynamic design of the T600 semitractor utilizes several features that mark a major shift away from the Kenworth W900. To accommodate for the hood design, the T600 chassis uses a set-back front axle (a first for a Kenworth conventional). Along with a smaller turning radius (nearly 25% less than a standard conventional[4][7]), the configuration allowed for designers to add longer front springs to the suspension, improving weight distribution and ride.[1][4][7] Additionally, the lower hoodline would also lead to better forward visibility.[7] In contrast to the cycle-style fenders utilized by traditional Class 8 conventionals, the T600 integrated the front fenders into the bumper, along with extending into the side fuel-tank skirts (standard on most versions of the T600), making the lower body work together to reduce drag.

    T600A (1990–1994)[edit]

    In 1990, Kenworth enhanced the design of the T600, renaming it the T600A. In what would become another distinguishing feature of the model line, the T600A redesigned the rear view mirrors, integrating the side view and convex mirrors into a single housing mounted to the cab (instead of the doors). To further reduce drag, the grille was redesigned, with the shortened W900 grille replaced by a twin-segment grille. The two flat windshields were replaced by a curved glass, available as one piece or two split in the center. In another change, the Aerodyne sleeper cab from the 1970s was replaced by the Aerodyne II sleeper. While also distinguished by twin rooftop windows (shifting to curved window class), the Aerodyne II sleeper was more aerodynamic. The T600A also received a digital dashboard as an option, developed in conjunction with Boeing.[8]

    T600B (1995–2007)[edit]

    In late 1994, the 1995 T600B replaced the T600A. The sleeper was replaced with the new Aerocab sleeper, which integrated the cab and sleeper into basically a single unit, fully open between the two. The roof of the cab was raised upward several inches (to better integrate with the design with the Aerocab sleeper). Another change involved the addition of turn signal repeaters added to rear-facing portion of the front fenders.

    In 1994, following the launch of the T600B, the United States Department of Transportation awarded Kenworth the National Award for the Advancement of Motor Vehicle Research and Development.[6]

    In 1997, the hood of the T600B underwent a functional change, changing from a one-piece to a three-piece design (allowing for easier replacement of front fenders). Following the introduction of the Kenworth T2000, the T600B was renamed the T600. During the 2000s, as with the W900, Kenworth introduced "Daylight Doors", replacing the standard door configuration with vent windows with a single-piece window with a notched forward section to provide additional forward visibility.

    T660 (2008–2017)[edit]

    For 2008, the T660 was introduced as the replacement for the T600. Retaining the Aerocab cab/sleeper of the T600, in a major shift, the T660 adopted diesel engines produced by PACCAR. For the first time since 1990, the aerodynamics of the hood and fenders were updated, as the T660 introduced composite headlamps faired into the fenders while adopting a grille similar to the T2000 conventional. Front axle ratings ranged from 12,000–14,600 lb (5,400–6,600 kg) and rear axle options ranged from 23,000 lb (10,000 kg) single to 46,000 lb (21,000 kg) tandem.

    Four sleeper lengths were available: 38, 62, 72, and 86 inches, with the high-roof Aerodyne available in the longer three and the low-profile FlatTop available in the shorter three lengths.[9]

    In 2016, Kenworth announced they were discontinuing the T660 in favor of the T680.

    T680[edit]

    The Kenworth T680 is a class 8 truck model introduced in 2013/14.[citation needed] It is the direct successor to the Kenworth T700, and, to an extent, the Kenworth T660.

    Engine Options:

    Name Type Displacement (Liters) HP Torque (Lb-ft)
    PACCAR MX-13 I6 Turbo Diesel 12.9 380-500 1450-1850
    Cummins ISX-12 I6 Turbo Diesel 12 370-450 1350-1450
    Cummins ISx-15 I6 Turbo Diesel 14.9 450-600 1450-2050

    Depending on engine options and the load in the trailer, the Kenworth T680 can reach up to 7.2 MPG.[citation needed] The T680E is the battery-electric version with 150 miles range.[10] The T680 platform is also used in the Toyota hydrogen fuel cell trucks.

    Gallery[edit]

    • 1987 Kenworth T600 tow truck

    • Kenworth T600A (New Zealand)

    • T600B with Aerocab sleepercab

    Variants[edit]

    T400 (1988–1997)[edit]

    The Kenworth T400 is a Class 8 variant of the T600 semitractor. Built with a slightly shortened hood (for a 112-inch BBC length), the T400 was designed for regional shipping and local delivery applications.[11]

    T800 (1987–present)[edit]

    Introduced in 1987, the Kenworth T800 is a heavy-duty variant of the T600. Produced as both a semitractor and a straight truck, the T800 is distinguished by the T600 in several ways, including its use of round fenders, optional exposed air cleaners, and the use of a grille similar to the W900, the T800 is designed for multiple applications, ranging from severe-service applications, regional and long-haul shipping.[12]

    References[edit]

    External links[edit]

    Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenworth_T600
    C-29268 2006 KENWORTH T600

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    T600 06 kenworth

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    2006 kenworth t800 review

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