Modern dodge charger

Modern dodge charger DEFAULT

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Not everyone will agree on this one, or will they?

Out of all the beloved classic American muscle cars, the 1969 Dodge Charger is one of the most beloved. Certainly, performance is one of the reasons the Mopar is so legendary, but looks play a big factor as well, since most agree the car looks nearly perfect in factory form. For this reason, most people try to keep cosmetic tweaks to a minimum, but every once in a while someone comes along to shake that up.

image credit: Instagram

Then you have this rendering done by artist Marcell Sebestyen and posted to his Instagram account. He calls this thoroughly modern interpretation of the ’69 Charger the NUMBER1 Charger. In the post, he said the selection of the ’69 Dodge Charger had to do with him loving the car. For other Mopar fans that might seem a little difficult to believe, but that’s what the man claims.

image credit: Instagram

This rendering is supposed to be a restomod with some pretty dramatic cosmetic modifications. That front fascia is probably the biggest shock, especially the additional pieces in exposed carbon fiber. It’s almost like halfway between the Charger and the Charger Daytona, only we get part of a nose cone for reasons we’re not clear on. It also almost gives the car almost a JDM tuner feel, which is just all kinds of wrong for a muscle car.

image credit: Instagram

Those vertical LED headlights people no doubt will hate are, according to Sebestyen, supposed to make the Charger look meaner. Yeah, that’s a big swing and a miss there. The LED taillights don’t look too bad since they’re more in keeping with the original feel, but we feel they’re a little too thin to really carry that muscular rear successfully. Another 3 or 4 rows of lights would’ve been great, but oh well.

We really want to hear what you all think of this rendering? Is it something you’d like to see in a real life or is it an abomination?

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Sours: https://autos.yahoo.com/modernized-1969-dodge-charger-polarizes-190000626.html

Modern Dodge Charger Coupe Rendering Looks Like a BMW M8 Rival

However, people often get them a little confused or wonder what the Charger would have looked like if it were the shape that made it iconic - a large 2-door muscle car. It's thus not uncommon for people to render a modern Charger coup' with small revisions to its doors.

However, this rendering by wb.artist20 has a lot more going for it. It's the usual Charger at first glance, but the familiarity is interrupted not just by it being a coupe, but also the way the front end is shaped. Dodge's design language doesn't advance at a rapid pace, and you can almost connect this all the way back to 2006.

The rendering gets a retro twist in the form of rectangular headlights and square air scoops. However, some of the other lines flow as well as on a Viper. And that almost answers a very important question: why make both the Charger and a Challenger as coupes? Well, then you could have one boxy and muscular, while the other can play "European sports car rival."

Of course, if Dodge would go after the Germans and Italians, it would target the profitable Sports Activity Coupes, not the slow-selling AMGS 63 Coupe or even the BMW M8 Coupe. 4x4 are the volume sellers, the big money-makers, and we bet there's a Chrysler boardroom briefing that has "Charger SUV" written on the folder.

Even though auto journalists are usually stoned for saying this, we'd rather have a Charger SUVwith sporty styling and a Hellcat engine rather than another coupe. A sports truck wouldn't be too bad either.

Sours: https://www.autoevolution.com/news/modern-dodge-charger-coupe-rendering-looks-like-a-bmw-m8-rival-149756.html
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Here’s Why American Tuners Fell in Love With the Modern Dodge Charger

Meet John, a 24-year-old mechanic’s apprentice and aspiring muscle car Instagrammer who’s never owned a car that didn’t wear the Dodge logo in his entire life. He drove a sparsely modified 2015 V6 Charger SE-AWDbefore his current 2016 5.7-liter HEMI V8 Charger build, and a 2003 Durango Magnum V8 before that.

If there was anyone able to explain why Americans are obsessed with modern Chargers, Challengers, and all things Mopar, it’s him. He also happens to be one of my oldest gearhead buddies from way back in high school.

In fairness, the LD platform John’s Charger sits on last had a significant refresh ten years ago. The LD platform, which included the Charger and the current Chrysler 300, shared components with the previous LX platform that first hit American roads in 2004. So, in short, it’s a complete dinosaur, at least to most Europeans. Even so, you won’t hear John or most other Charger drivers complaining much about that.

“I really don’t give a damn if it’s based on an old platform, and I doubt if other people who drive them really care either. It works and it's easy to work on. Can't say that about most cars this powerful,"John said about his Charger. "If anything, since I put coil-overs at all four corners, the car handles like it’s on rails. It has a nice ride for something so big and heavy too.” 

It’d been a few years since John and I had the chance to get together. He’d been working as a mechanic’s apprentice before the ongoing health crisis forced him and all his fellow techs home indefinitely. To make up for all the lost time, we decided to do something you wouldn’t expect any muscle car driver ever to want to do.

We decided to take John’s Charger on the winding backroads that lead to the affluent Lloyd Harbor neighborhood in the exclusive North Shore of Long Island, New York. Thanks to John’s upgrades, this was just as much fun as it would have been in a European sports car that’s three times the price.

Apart from the BC Racing coilover suspension mentioned above, John’s done a ton of work to his Charger. As an intelligent and highly educated muscle car fan, his first order of business was to have both exhaust resonators and mufflers deleted. Because all those do is make the iconic 5.7 HEMI more tolerable for non-car-enthusiasts, and frankly, who cares what they have to say.

The new four-inch exhaust tips made for a fantastic soundtrack as John ripped through the gears in AutoStick mode up and down the winding roads of Lloyd Harbor. A complete StopTech brake system kit beefs up the Charger’s pads, rotors, and calipers to help all 4,200 and a bit pounds (1,934 kg) from hurdling off the road and into the Long Island Sound. A 3.09 limited-slip differential upgraded from a junked Scat Pack and chunky summer tires 45 inches wide in the front and 40 in the rear further helps those efforts.

John couldn’t help but tinker with the 5.7-liter HEMI engine, adding a custom sport tune from Hemifever Tuning based in Apex, North Carolina. John figures his Charger makes around 390 horsepower to the wheels with the new tune. It all came together to become a personalized and totally unique daily driver that brings more smiles per gallon than it gets in miles per gallon. The added Spoilerking roof wing and Barton Industries shifter handle only add to its visual appeal.

The sun started to set as we pulled up to a quiet gravel lot next to a private yacht harbor. It was the perfect opportunity to show off some of the tasteful LED interior and exterior accent lights John had fitted. The light strips in the car’s footwells and undercarriage bathed us both in a warm glow as we talked about old times, but also about why Americans, himself included, are infatuated with modern muscle cars.

“My dream car’s always been a 1969 Charger RT, but those are million-dollar cars these days in the right conditions. The new ones are for sure the next best thing,”John explained as we walked around his car, taking pictures from as many angles as we could. “Sure, a BMW M5 from the same year might be faster at the drag strip or the track. But on real roads, this is just as fast and so much cheaper.”

With that thought, John hit on the nail exactly why Americans love not just modern Mopar, but modern muscle cars in general. To the rest of the world, the Charger is a big, inefficient relic that should have been replaced years ago. But to red-blooded Americans cruising the long, wide interstates in packs like John and his friends like to do, these cars are their ticket to the American dream.

As petrolheads, a few common threads bring folks together to bond over their shared passion for four wheels and an engine. As car enthusiasts make their way in the world, we don’t just bond over the vehicles themselves but also the friendships we make along the way. That’s why it was my distinct pleasure to showcase his custom Charger HEMI build

Be sure to check out John’s Instagram page @john_hemi to see the awesome things he has planned for his pride and joy. It’s the least I can do to repay him for those innumerable high school classes texting jpegs of then brand-new Hellcats instead of paying attention.

Sours: https://www.autoevolution.com/news/heres-why-american-tuners-fell-in-love-with-the-modern-dodge-charger-171899.html
FULL Carbon Fiber 950HP Charger - Everything Inside \u0026 Out - Bumper 2 Bumper

Modernized 1969 Dodge Charger Polarizes

Not everyone will agree on this one, or will they?


Out of all the beloved classic American muscle cars, the 1969 Dodge Charger is one of the most beloved. Certainly, performance is one of the reasons the Mopar is so legendary, but looks play a big factor as well, since most agree the car looks nearly perfect in factory form. For this reason, most people try to keep cosmetic tweaks to a minimum, but every once in a while someone comes along to shake that up.

Then you have this rendering done by artist Marcell Sebestyen and posted to his Instagram account. He calls this thoroughly modern interpretation of the ’69 Charger the NUMBER1 Charger. In the post, he said the selection of the ’69 Dodge Charger had to do with him loving the car. For other Mopar fans that might seem a little difficult to believe, but that’s what the man claims.

This rendering is supposed to be a restomod with some pretty dramatic cosmetic modifications. That front fascia is probably the biggest shock, especially the additional pieces in exposed carbon fiber. It’s almost like halfway between the Charger and the Charger Daytona, only we get part of a nose cone for reasons we’re not clear on. It also almost gives the car almost a JDM tuner feel, which is just all kinds of wrong for a muscle car.

Those vertical LED headlights people no doubt will hate are, according to Sebestyen, supposed to make the Charger look meaner. Yeah, that’s a big swing and a miss there. The LED taillights don’t look too bad since they’re more in keeping with the original feel, but we feel they’re a little too thin to really carry that muscular rear successfully. Another 3 or 4 rows of lights would’ve been great, but oh well.

We really want to hear what you all think of this rendering? Is it something you’d like to see in a real life or is it an abomination?

Sours: https://www.motorious.com/articles/news/modernized-1969-dodge-charger/

Charger modern dodge

Overview

The 2022 Dodge Charger has the distinction of being the only V-8-powered sedan that starts under $40,000. While the Chrysler 300 also offers a V-8 with a rear-wheel-drive layout, it's fancier and pricier. The Charger is less refined, with questionable interior quality and an overly firm ride that gets worse on the optional 20-inch wheels. As with the Dodge Challenger coupe, it has a standard V-6 and available all-wheel drive. However, the most exciting Charger has a vociferous Hemi V-8 under the hood, either a 370-hp 5.7-liter or a 485-hp 6.4-liter. The latter is reserved for the Scat Pack model, which isn't as aggro as the separately reviewed 700-plus-hp Charger SRT Hellcat, but it is the sportiest non-SRT model and offers a distinctive widebody appearance. Although not everyone will appreciate the 2022 Charger, anyone who wants a throwback sedan with countless nostalgic character will.

What's New for 2022?

For 2022, Dodge makes only small changes to the Charger lineup. The Driver Convenience Group package now includes a deluxe security alarm, which should come in handy in the event that anyone tries to boost (read: steal) an owner's prized ride. The alarm is also now standard on Scat Pack models, too.

Pricing and Which One to Buy

We think the Charger R/T, with its 370-hp 5.7-liter V-8, has the perfect mix of power and features. Those who want all-wheel drive are limited to the V-6 versions. The bigger 485-hp V-8 that comes with the Scat Pack makes accelerating great again but costs about $5000 more than the R/T. Along with a standard 8.4-inch Uconnect touchscreen with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, our choice includes a throbbing dual-mode exhaust, a leather-wrapped performance steering wheel, and 20-inch rims. We'd also add the Driver Convenience Group (blind-spot monitor, rear cross-traffic alert, heated exterior mirrors, and upgraded headlights) and the Performance Handling Group (20-inch wheels with all-season performance tires, Brembo brakes, and sport-tuned suspension).

Engine, Transmission, and Performance

The Charger channels its NASCAR roots with big V-8 power and rowdy sounds. However, not every Charger has a mighty Hemi V-8 under the hood—what a pity—but they do all share an excellent eight-speed automatic transmission and standard rear-wheel drive. In contrast, the V-6 is subdued but does add the availability of all-wheel drive. Dodge doesn't build a Charger with a manual gearbox, but it would be so much cooler if it did. The standard V-6 is no slouch, yet it lacks the giddy-up of front-drivers such as the Nissan Maxima. The more powerful versions excel at the strip, where the 485-hp Charger R/T Scat Pack posted an impressive 3.8-second sprint to 60 mph. The 370-hp Charger has enough ponies to outrun most family sedans. The bright (Green Go) Charger we paraded around town had a quiet and composed ride. Its large 20-inch wheels were relaxed on most surfaces, but obstacles such as railroad crossings and potholes disrupted its composure. The big-bodied sedan was remarkably balanced when cornering, too. Although the V-6 version we tested had nearly identical cornering grip, the Daytona's hefty horsepower advantage amplified the fun. The electrically assisted power steering contributes to the Charger's purposeful control, but its feedback is too heavy and slow to be engaging. We've tested several Chargers for emergency braking, and the best results came from the high-performance models with upgraded brakes and stickier summer performance tires.

Fuel Economy and Real-World MPG

The Charger is a big, heavy car with a healthy appetite for fuel. Although it has below-average EPA estimates in the city, it has fairly competitive highway ratings. While we haven't tested the 5.7-liter V-8 on our 75-mph real-world fuel-economy route, which is part of our extensive testing regimen, we have tested the V-6 with all-wheel drive and the larger 485-hp V-8. Surprisingly, both engines were within 1 mpg of each other, with the six earning 26 mpg on the highway and the eight earning 25 mpg. For more information about the Charger's fuel economy, visit the EPA's website.

Interior, Comfort, and Cargo

The Charger's interior is highly functional yet the opposite of luxurious, with more rubberized materials than the set of an adult film. Apart from excellent rear-seat legroom, its passenger space is slightly below average. The cabin's simplistic design is classic muscle car, but options are plentiful. Although its trunk volume is similar to those of most rivals, the Charger was able to fit an extra carry-on box than its rivals. It held 18 total with the rear seat stowed, beating the Maxima and the fastback-hatchback Kia Stinger by three. Its center console features plenty of spots for small items and a slot alongside the shifter that is perfect for storing your smartphone.

Infotainment and Connectivity

Every Challenger has a version of the excellent Uconnect infotainment system. That means standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto as part of a 7.0-inch or 8.4-inch touchscreen. Although the system we tested elicited good response times, some optional controls can only be accessed via the touchscreen; a Wi-Fi hotspot also is unavailable.

Safety and Driver-Assistance Features

The big Dodge sedan does offer a host of driver-assistance technology, including adaptive cruise control and automated emergency braking. However, those features cost extra, and base models are excluded from the most advanced options. For more information about the Charger's crash-test results, visit the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) websites. Key safety features include:

  • Available blind-spot monitoring and rear cross-traffic alert
  • Available lane-departure warning and lane-keeping assist
  • Available forward-collision warning

Warranty and Maintenance Coverage

Dodge provides an average limited and powertrain warranty set that aligns with the Maxima's coverage, but the Kia Cadenza has a significantly longer powertrain warranty and the Toyota Avalon offers complimentary maintenance.

  • Limited warranty covers three years or 36,000 miles
  • Powertrain warranty covers five years or 60,000 miles
  • No complimentary scheduled maintenance

Specifications

Specifications:

VEHICLE TYPE: front-engine, all-wheel-drive, 5-passenger, 4-door sedan

PRICE AS TESTED: $41,325 (base price: $34,340)

ENGINE TYPE: DOHC 24-valve V-6, aluminum block and heads, port fuel injection

Displacement: 220 cu in, 3604 cc
Power: 300 hp @ 6350 rpm
Torque: 264 lb-ft @ 4800 rpm

TRANSMISSION: 8-speed automatic with manual shifting mode

CHASSIS:
Suspension (F/R): control arms/multilink
Brakes (F/R): 13.6-in vented disc/12.6-in vented disc
Tires: Michelin Primacy MXM4, 235/55R-19 101H M+S

DIMENSIONS:
Wheelbase: 120.2 in
Length: 198.4 in
Width: 75.0 in Height: 58.2 in
Passenger volume: 102 cu ft
Trunk volume: 17 cu ft
Curb weight: 4281 lb

C/D TEST RESULTS:
Zero to 60 mph: 6.4 sec
Zero to 100 mph: 16.6 sec
Zero to 130 mph: 35.0 sec
Rolling start, 5–60 mph: 6.8 sec
Top gear, 30–50 mph: 4.1 sec
Top gear, 50–70 mph: 5.1 sec
Standing ¼-mile: 14.9 sec @ 95 mph
Top speed (governor limited): 132 mph
Braking, 70–0 mph: 176 ft
Roadholding, 300-ft-dia skidpad: 0.79 g

C/D FUEL ECONOMY:
Observed: 20 mpg
75-mph highway driving: 26 mpg
Highway range: 480 mi

EPA FUEL ECONOMY:
Combined/city/highway: 21/18/27 mpg

>>CLICK TO DOWNLOAD TEST SHEET<<

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More Features and Specs

Sours: https://www.caranddriver.com/dodge/charger
707hp Dodge Charger Hellcat Widebody review: see why it's a BMW M3 slayer!

3 Reason Why the Modern Dodge Charger has been a Smashing Success

When the modern Dodge Charger was introduced for the 2006 model year, it arrived under a cloud of controversy within the Mopar community. Traditionalists and purists were outraged the Dodge reincarnated the famous Charger name as a big four-door sedan, rather than as a big two-door hardtop like it was in the 1960s and 1970s, insisting that the car was sure to fail because Mopar fans wouldn’t accept a four-door Charger.

Fortunately, those folks were all wrong, as the Charger was an instant success and since 2006, it has risen to be the most popular large sedan as well as the most popular rear-wheel-drive sedan in the United States. While it comes as little surprise that the Charger is the bestselling rear-drive sedan, since many sedans are front-wheel-drive-based, the fact that the muscular Dodge four-door outsells models like the Ford Taurus and Chevy Impala shows that Americans want more than just space in their full sized sedans.

The modern Charger rose to fame at a time when fuel prices were at record highs, when other automakers were focusing on smaller, more efficient sedans with front-drive layouts across every size segment, Dodge was building a car that many people thought didn’t make sense. The critics insisted that people who buy sedans want efficiency and comfort, but year after year, the Charger just keeps on proving them all wrong – posting strong sales numbers while other sedans disappear from the American landscape altogether.

Today, we take a look at why the Dodge Charger sedan has been so popular since being introduced, and it really comes down to three key points.

Charger is the Only Four Door Muscle Car
While some people cringe at referring to anything with more than two doors as a muscle car, Dodge has long marketed the modern Charger as a four-door muscle car and in every regard, the folks with the automaker are right. While it has “too many doors” to fit into the classic muscle car description, it is a big, powerful, rear-drive machine with roomy front and rear seats – just like the classic muscle cars.

That is really what makes the modern Dodge Charger special, as it offers the performance and overall driving feel of a muscle car with the functionality of a big sedan. With the current Charger, owners get very comparable performance to what Challenger owners enjoy, but Charger owners enjoy that performance with a side of extra seating space, topped with easy access to the rear seat. The Charger has grown so well over the years because unlike any other sedan on the market, there is very little performance differential between itself and the two-door performance car from the same dealership.

Dodge Charger

While Ford has tried to offer Mustang-like performance in the Taurus SHO, they clearly haven’t embodied the feel of the pony car into their sedan. Chevrolet went so far as to market the SS Sport Sedan as a “four door Corvette”, but that Holden-built machine was expensive for the lackluster level of stock performance, and it quickly died off, just like the Pontiac G8 had a few years earlier. Really, the G8 was the closest true competitor to the Charger with a full spread of engines and performance levels, but when Pontiac died, so did the G8 program. The Chevy SS was just a newer, rebadged G8, but it was only offered in one, expensive trim level that fell way short on performance.

In other words, if a Chevy or Ford lover absolutely had to get into a sedan for whatever reason, they had to compromise big time on performance, but for Dodge fans who needed the extra space of the Charger over the Challenger, there has been a no-compromise answer for years.

This same theory applies to everyone who looks at the Dodge Charger due to its performance capabilities combined with loads of cargo space, as there is no other sedan sold in the US market that has such a broad offering of performance and prices. The only true competitors to the Charger at this point are the European luxury sedans, but to get those rear-drive sedans in their high performance forms you will pay far more money than with the Charger.

Basically, the biggest reason why the Dodge Charger has done so well since being introduced for 2006 is that it offers the driving dynamics, the attitude and the overall performance of a muscle car in a large sedan. The fact that it is the bestselling large sedan in America makes it clear that Americans who drive big sedans don’t want boring, front-drive hybrids – they want rear-drive, Hemi-powered muscle cars with “too many doors”.

Charger Offers Lots of Bang for the Buck
As mentioned above, the only true competitors to the full-sized, rear-drive Dodge Charger come from brands like Mercedes-Benz, BMW and Lexus. Those companies all offer a wide range of power levels and prices, but their prices are much higher than the Chargers while their range of power is a bit lower. The 2020 Dodge Charger starts in base form with the 300 horsepower Pentastar V6 and continues into three different Hemi V8s – the 5.7-liter mill with 370 horsepower, the 6.4-liter engine with 485 horsepower and the Hellcat with 707 or 717 horsepower depending on the package. The 300 horsepower model starts at just under $31,000, the 370 horsepower model starts under $38,000, the 485 horsepower model starts around $42,000 and the 707 horsepower Hellcat starts around $69,000.

For comparison, the BMW 530i has 248 horsepower and it starts at $53,900. The 523 horsepower M550i starts at $77,000 and the M5 with 600 horsepower starts at north of $102,000. Mind you, the 5 Series is a touch smaller than the Charger, but if we step up to the BMW 7 Series, the prices aren’t even reasonably comparable to the Dodge.

Dodge Charger

Of course, the Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat has been a strong seller since being launched for the 2015 model year based on the fact that no four-door sedan in the world with a combustion engine offers 707 horsepower and 650 lb-ft of torque, but across the rest of the lineup, there is no question that the Charger offers impressive performance for the price. For instance, the 485 horsepower Charger Scat Pack starts just over $42,000 and there are few four-door cars in the world for under $75,000 that will even come close to beating the Hemi-powered machine.

Even with the lower-power models, including the SXT and GT with 300 horsepower or the R/T with 370 horsepower, there are few sedans on the market that offer comparable performance for the price – and even in slightly higher price classes, the Charger outshines all of the competitors.

In much the same way that the Charger attracts those buyers who want muscle car performance with sedan functionality, the big Dodge attracts buyers with its low price-per-horsepower across the lineup. However, it isn’t just big power for the price, as the Charger is offered with a long list of premium features that were once reserved for luxury cars, but in this case, they are available in an affordable sedan, often with Hemi power.

Charger has Improved Every Year
Finally, the reason that the Charger has continued to bring back previous customers to buy new models is the fact that Dodge is constantly improving the car, even if only in small increments.

When the modern Charger was introduced back in 2005 for the 2006 model year, the 3.5-liter V6 offered just 250 horsepower, while the 5.7-liter Hemi delivered 340 horsepower and the first SRT8 Charger packed 425 horsepower. Back in 2006, that 425 horsepower model was a shocker, as we really didn’t have many American sedans with power like that and more importantly, the modern Dodge Challenger hadn’t been introduced yet. The Charger offered Dodge lovers a rear-drive, V8-powered car that offered far more power than the likes of the Ford Mustang, helping drive the car’s initial sales success.

As time went on, Dodge introduced new, more powerful engines, starting with the 392 Hemi in 2012, which delivered 470 horsepower and 470 lb-ft of torque. At that same time, the base V6 with 292 horsepower was introduced while the 5.7-liter Hemi got a bump in power to 370 horsepower. In 2015, the 392 was up to 485 horsepower and, of course, 2015 also brought about the introduction of the 707 horsepower Hellcat Charger.

Dodge Charger

While the power levels haven’t changed every year, Dodge has made small changes in each model year, introducing special trim levels like the Daytona. The brand has also done a great job of taking features of pricier trim levels, like the brakes, suspension and wheel/tire combination of the Hellcat and making it available to R/T and Scat Pack buyers as part of the Daytona package. There are also color palate changes, new wheels and new interior trim changes from year to year, keeping the model fresh even without major mid-cycle refreshes or whole new generations.

Finally, Dodge has done a great job of continually introducing improvements in interior technology, building on the award winning UConnect touchscreen system with new features and compatibility upgrades, making it easier to enjoy the features of your smartphone through the controls of the car.

Sure, lots of vehicles offer similar premium interior features and space to the Dodge Charger, but few competitors offer the power level or the driving dynamics of the Charger and no competitors offer the combination of interior technology, space and performance for anywhere near the Charger’s price range.

Patrick Rall @TheAutoBeard is the Managing Editor of Torque News. Please follow us on Twitter at @TorqueNewsAuto, Facebook and send us tips. You can also Follow Patrick on Youtube.

Sours: https://www.torquenews.com/106/3-reason-why-modern-dodge-charger-has-been-smashing-success

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