Casio px 200

Casio px 200 DEFAULT

PX-200

Song Expansion
You can download songs to a computer and then transfer up to 10 of them to digital piano memory and expand the number of songs available.*1 You also can use an SD memory card*2 to store song data and recordings of your performances. A USB port*3 is provided for easy connection to a computer.
*1Approximately 3.1 MB total; Up to approximately 318 KB per song. Capacity values are based on 1 MB = 1,024 KB, and 1 KB = 1,024 bytes. SMF Converter software (which is on the CD-ROM that comes with the digital piano and is available from the CASIO Music Site) must be installed on the computer in order to transfer music data to digital piano memory.
*2Supported SD memory card capacities: 16 MB, 32 MB, 64 MB, 128 MB, 256 MB, 512 MB, 1 GB Playback of SMF; save and load of data; card formatting
*3Driver is included on the bundled CD-ROM; USB cable not included
88 KEYS with TOUCH RESPONSE
(3 sensitivity levels, off)
162 TONES: 12 panel tones, 20 various tones, 128 GM tones, 2 drum sets
LAYER/SPLIT
20 RHYTHMS (for piano)
AUTO-ACCOMPANIMENT
DIGITAL EFFECTS : Reverb (4 types), Chorus (4 types), Brilliance, DSP (preset for some panel and various tones)
METRONOME
RECORDER: 2 tracks x 5 songs, Approximately 50,000 notes total; Up to approximately 10,000 notes per song, real-time recording
128-note polyphony (maximum)
Key transpose
Tuning Control
Terminals: headphones x 2, pedal x 2
(damper, soft / sostenuto), MIDI IN/OUT, USB port, line out x 2 (L/MONO, R)
Speakers: 12cm/6cm (oval) x 2, 5cm x 2
(amplifier: 8W + 8W)
Size (W x D x H) : 1,322 x 278 x 134mm /
1,306 x 288 x 767mm
(with special stand CS-66P)
Weight : 12.0kg / 21.5kg
(with special stand CS-66P)
Comes with pedal (SP-3), AC adaptor (AD-12), score book, music stand, dust cover , and CD-ROM (USB driver and SMF Converter)*
EAN code : 4971850361268
*Supported Operating Systems
USB driver: Windows® 98 / 98SE / Me / 2000 Professional / XP Home Edition / XP Professional (Mac OS not supported.)
SMF Converter: Windows® 98SE / Me / XP Home Edition / XP Professional (Mac OS not supported.)
Sours: http://arch.casio-intl.com/asia-mea/en/emi/past/privia/px200.html
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I recently received my ordered Casio PX-200 from music123.com for $400 with the pay $500, get $100 off deal. Shipping was free. The shipping process was a bit of an ordeal, but a manager finally worked things out for me and my piano arrived in about a week.

I previously owned a Kawai Digital Piano (originally a $3,500 piece of hardware back in 1994), but sold it about 4 years ago for $500. I was eager to get back into playing and composing via USB (previously MIDI). I was looking for a realistic sound, feel and fair price. I feel, so far, I've met all three of my criteria.

The box arrived in the original Casio cardboard and was heavier then expected. I've read that a lot of posters on these boards mentioned how light it is. Perhaps I'm just a weakling, but the rectangular box was a little odd to lift. Upon opening the box I found the keyboard surrounded by three pieces of Styrofoam underneath of which had a manual, a song book (fairly large) and a CD (for USB/Midi use with a PC). I also found a foot pedal, sheet music stand and AC Adapter. Everything was nicely wrapped although I was a bit surprised at how vulnerable the actual piano keys appeared in shipping. Plastic surrounded the keys and the keyboard itself, but I was still surprised I could see the keys. I opted against a stand, for now.

I placed the piano on the table and started it up. The initialization takes about 10 seconds. I then started playing the primary Grand Piano and loved the sound. Things have certainly improved over the past 10 years. I tried a few other instruments as well. The strings sound pretty good too. I hooked up the pedal to sustain and it worked well. All in all, the piano sounded better, if not what I expected. The keys were responsive and the hammer action was realistic. 88 Keys takes up a lot of real estate, but I'm glad I opted for the full size.

The piano boasts a lot of functions too. The only thing I really don't like, so far, is the small display and how it appears not to be so user-friendly when performing tasks such as, splitting the keyboard, etc. Many of the keys have two functions which complicates things a little. All in all though, I'd rather have more functions and try to figure things out, then less, easier to use commands. I did manage to split the keyboard between piano and strings fairly easily which sounded great.

I've already downloaded the freeware version of Anvil (which looks like it should suit my multi-channel recordings just fine). I know I'll also appreciate the 128 note polyphony more when playing my multi-channel recordings back through the Piano. Perhaps someone can respond to me on whether I could record multichannels on the computer and then play multichannels back on the Piano with multiple instruments playing at the same time. I'm unsure about that because I thought I read that only two instruments can play simultaneously.

To sum, although it's early, this seems like a really good digital piano for someone on a budget that wants good sound and piano-like feel. And although it's last year's model, you can't beat the $400 price tag.


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"Perhaps someone can respond to me on whether I could record multichannels on the computer and then play multichannels back on the Piano with multiple instruments playing at the same time. I'm unsure about that because I thought I read that only two instruments can play simultaneously."

How would you play back from the computer without line in?


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Couldn't I use USB. Can't the USB port send MIDI-type messages back and forth? I assume it could since I could record from the USB port to PC software or am I missing the boat.


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I own the PX-200 as well. My main concern prior to my purchase was key action. As my first DP, I specifically opted for a heavier action. I have tried the Yamaha P120, and the PX-200 has even stiffer (or better to some) key action. I can say that it has its flaws (try very slowly tap down the keys. A real piano will still sound, while the PX-200 does not seem to be able to register really slow key taps). Overall the key action is bordering on being "mushy", depends on your preference. But once you are used to it, its heavier action can afford greater "touch" and control over lighter actions.

The sound is great, especially if you use a good pair of headphones or monitors. I use mainly the first grand piano sound.

As for the USB connectivity, I would recommend sticking with MIDI connection. For some reason (at least on my computer), when I try to use the Casio as midi controller for Akoustik Piano (GREAT sounding sampler, btw) USB always wrecks the latency, whereas MIDI has very little of such problem.


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Originally posted by SteelersFan:
Couldn't I use USB. Can't the USB port send MIDI-type messages back and forth? I assume it could since I could record from the USB port to PC software or am I missing the boat.

I don't particularly use the USB-MIDI when I arrange/sequence MIDI music but I do use the conventional MIDI In/out ports of my PX-320 since my soundcards both have dedicated MIDI-IN/OUT ports.

Yes, you can route the MIDI data/messages BACK to your PX-200 DP by setting it up within a particular audio-MIDI software.

> I can only cite Cakewalk as an example since I've been using their Audio-MIDI sequencing/production software for the last 7-8 years and quite familiar with their GUI (prior to that, I started out with using Digital Orchestrator and the Digital Orchestrator Plus thereafter by Voyetra)

> In the OPTIONS menu, there is an item named "MIDI Devices"...left-click on it and it brings up a selection window for the available devices for MIDI INPUT and MIDI OUTPUT

> typically you would see under the MIDI INPUT:

1) your soundcard's MIDI In (if you have a separate soundcard and NOT using the integrated sound chip of a "do-it-all" motherboard in your PC which has only the MIC-in, Line out, front speaker/rear speaker etc. MINUS the usual JOYSTICK/MIDI port and/or DEDICATED MIDI IN/OUT ports)

2) MPU UART

3) any other MIDI devices with MIDI IN connectivity connected to your PC


> under MIDI OUTPUT devices (PC with Windows XP):

1) you'd see your soundcard's synth

e.g.: in one of my PC's installed soundcard, mine reads "kX Synth SB006 5.1" which stands for my SB Live's 5.1 MIDI synth

2) Microsoft MIDI Mapper

3) UART + your soundcards model number

If you want the MIDI data to be coursed through your soundcard's built-in synth, then select as your MIDI OUT device your soundcard's "synth" and the MIDI music would be heard in your PC's speaker system.

If you want to course your MIDI music through your DIGITAL PIANO/Keyboard with dedicated MIDI IN/OUT ports or USB-MIDI ports, then you can choose the MPU-UART port...Your MIDI music data will then be coursed through the MPU-UART into your DPs MIDI-IN port and/or USB-MIDI...and then you should hear MIDI music being played through your DP's built-in speakers.

OR, you can choose to COMBINE both MPU-UART and your soundcard's synth as MIDI OUTPUTs so that you'd hear MIDI music being played BOTH in your DP speakers and in your PCs speaker.

For the PX-320 users, MIDI connections discussion is on page E-38 and E-39 of the manual. I can't say where it is exactly on the PX-200's manual though, but I'm sure you have your manual and can look it up under "CONNECTING TO A COMPUTER" section wink

* Regarding playing MIDI tracks on the PX-200/PX-320, both have 16-MIDI channels and are multi-timbral. In fact, you can play a MIDI sequence/music with 16-tracks. ANYTHING beyond the 16th track (i.e. the 17th track and above) will not be played back.

You probably got the 2-track recorder function (there are 2 tracks per user-song bank memory AND there are 5 user-song memory banks) CONFUSED with the 16-MIDI channels/multi-timbral capability of the PX-200/PX-320.

You can only RECORD 2 tracks per user-song bank when using the built-in recorder function of the PX-200/PX-320...

BUT you can play MIDI music with up to 16-tracks (or 16 different instrument patches/tones playing SIMULTANEOUSLY)


@ guest1013:

I think you may have confused the LINE-IN (available only in the PX-320) with the MIDI IN feature (w/ 16-Channel multi-timbral feature) of BOTH PX-200/PX-320 though.

The LINE-IN is used for coursing AUDIO music from an external audio device through the built-in speaker of the PX-320. In other words, if say, you have another audio equipment like a stereo with the typical LINE 0UTs, you can play an audio CD/MP3 CD and make the sound come out of the PX-320's speakers WHILE you jam along or play along the music with your DP smile....

OR, if you have a Tape recorder, or a dedicated MIDI sound module having the typical LINE OUTs, you can route back the audio from its LINE OUT port into the LINE-IN port of the PX-320 to be output by it's built-in speakers and you could, again...jam along with it cool

Using the USB-MIDI port, however, allows only for transfering/coursing/streaming data files or like MIDI and Casio format music data (downloaded from Casio website).

AUDIO data is coursed through the LINE-IN of the PX-320. A MULTI-track MIDI sequence/music can be played using EITHER the MIDI IN/OUT port OR the USB-MIDI connectivity option of the PX-200/PX-320.

I hope these would clarify some confusion smile


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Has anyone tried a USB to MIDI cable for PC access? Is there still latency? Does it work? My soundcard doesn't have a dedicated MIDI input so I'm wondering if the USB to MIDI is a better option than straight USB?


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Originally posted by SteelersFan:
Has anyone tried a USB to MIDI cable for PC access? Is there still latency? Does it work? My soundcard doesn't have a dedicated MIDI input so I'm wondering if the USB to MIDI is a better option than straight USB?

Perhaps this article would help, check out this link:

USB-MIDI

Have you tried installing the USB-MIDI driver of the PX-200 yet? If you installed it already then its probably time to try it out. If you don't have a MIDI sequencing software yet...try looking for the cheaper versions like Cakewalk Home Studio (click HERE) or Voyetra's beginner USB-MIDI package click HERE


PX-5S FA-06 LaunchKey 61 SL-MKII Graphite 49; VST: Pianoteq 6+Bluethner UVI TrueKeys EWQL-SO + Hollywood Strings/Brass, AAS GS-2+LL EP4 Sonokinetic; Mobile DAW ROG G751J: i7 4720 32GB RAM 250+500 GB SSD Scarlett 6i6 TS110A x2; https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfiQst_xQwNgKL_FS9OXSKw

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Okay, so last night I tried to hook up the piano to my PC using the USB port. I installed the freeware version of the Anvil software and plugged my USB A-B cable from the piano to the PC USB in port. The manual said the piano should be turned off when plugging in the cable, but I'm unsure why (perhaps it reads the status of the USB port on power on).

At any rate, I got Anvil up and running and pressed a few keys on the piano. The keys I pressed appeared in the piano window of the Anvil software so I knew it was reading my notes. I then recorded an initial piano track with Anvil and it worked great. I then created a second track with Anvil and changed the MIDI Out mapping for that particular track to "strings". I then recorded on that track and again it worked great. I then switched the MIDI Out to the USB Midi 1 Out and Anvil played both the piano and the strings track beautifully through the piano.

I didn't notice any latency issues at all albeit it was a small test. I also don't know how many tracks I can actually play back through the piano, but I know at least two work (I'll try more later).

A couple of side notes - the USB port on the back of the piano was oddly difficult to pull the cable out from. It kind of snaps in and you need to apply a little pressure to unplug it. Not ideal if you're continually plugging it in and out, but I'm sure it's fine. Also, in the Anvil software, I'm not sure it displayed my notes while I was playing, but I think displayed them afterwards. This may or may not be an issue. It could be based on the software or my processor speed - I'm unsure. Also, make sure when you do press keys on the piano that you're focused in the correct window in Anvil. If your current focus is in a particular track any piano key presses will be recorded automatically in that particular track's window (good for step by step insertion).

One other thing, I did try another piece of music software and noticed then when the Casio USB port was initialized with the CD, it actually created two input (and outputs) known as MIDI USB 1 IN and MIDI USB IN (or something similar to that - I'm not by my computer right now). I'm unsure of the difference.

All in all, still very pleased with the ability to multitrack and it worked easily.


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SteelersFan,

Latency should not be an issue with MIDI by itself. The MIDI commands are so small that they are not the source of latency.

You would encounter latency when using the keyboard as a MIDI controller for software samples such as Ivory, TruePianos, etc. In this case the source of the latency is the time it takes your computer and soundcard to playback the sound.

Rich



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Okay, so now I've noticed a couple of issues have come up with the piano. First, I noticed built-in rhythms 15-20 do not seem to work. I thought I read something about this on another thread, but wanted to verify that it's true. The second item is G# on the high end of the piano makes a slight scratchy sound on the right speaker of the piano only. Kind of sounds like a clipping sound and the volume needs to be at about 1 o'clock or more. Both issues are not enough to annoy me, but wanted to bring them up.


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Great review, SteelersFan.

I am glad you mentioned some of the issues with the PX-200 as I own one myself. And I got mine for under $400 as well. I have not installed the software on my PC as yet, since I will be rebuilding my PC (will keep XP; do not like Vista at all).

Again, thanks for the heads up with the built in rhythms not functioning. I will test this out and see if this could be a manufacturing defect.

- Mark



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Here is what I found out about the rhythms in early March:

posted March 09, 2008 06:58 PM Regarding the rhythm function, I was going through the user's guide and some paperwork in the packaging and came across a smaller sheet of paper, maybe 5 inches by 8 and a half inches. It says "Main Rhythms for Chord Accompaniments
With the rhythms listed below, make sure that CASIO CHORD, FINGERED, or FULL RANGE CHORD is selected before you try playing chords. The volume of percussion instruments is very low and percussion is inserted in a way that does not interfere with the overall mood of the rhythm." Then after stating this in other languages, it has a chart showing rhythms 10 and 14-20.

If you look at pages E13 and E14 in the user's guide, it explains using the Auto Accompaniment feature, which involves using the "Tempo" and "Mode" buttons.


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OK, so a lot of your guys got this Casio for $400. Did the price go up, or did you luck out? It seems that $699.99 is the going rate. I found 1 for $400, but it appears to be used.

Also, can any of your Casio PX-200 owners comment on the "Lesson Function" it supposedly has? How does it give a lesson?

Thanks,
Max.


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maxc246, I lucked out, there was an online sale last January and I did not purchase a stand or additional pedal.

I scanned through the user guide and there is no lesson function that I can find. I do see that online retailers list "lesson function" as a feature. There is a music library with which I could play along. The pieces are not for beginners, more in the advanced beginner/intermediate range. There are ways to have chords fingered, so one would learn about chords.


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Originally posted by guest1013:
maxc246, I lucked out, there was an online sale last January and I did not purchase a stand or additional pedal.

I scanned through the user guide and there is no lesson function that I can find. I do see that online retailers list "lesson function" as a feature. There is a music library with which I could play along. The pieces are not for beginners, more in the advanced beginner/intermediate range. There are ways to have chords fingered, so one would learn about chords.

Thanks for the input. I wonder why so many retail outlets list the Lesson Function and the owner's manual does not. That's rather odd. At any rate, have you tried using the MIDI or USB connection to your PC? If so, did you notice and latency issues?

I'm starting to think this will be the DP I settle on... even though it seems I'll be paying more than most others have.

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If I had to guess about the pricing of the PX200, one thought, based on comments of other PW PX 200 owners, is that the PX200 will be discontinued. PX200 came out in about June 2007. A quick tour of online retailers (zzounds,musicianfriends) shows this to be true, the PX200 is discontinued.
Another thought lately is: Casio wants to sell the newer PX120 and PX320 (came out in U.S. in about Feb. - March 2008) and so in comparing features and price, these newer models look more attractive than the PX200. I just saw that a few sellers are offering the PX320 with a simple stand and bench for very close to the same price as the PX200 (which isn't available anyway). A couple of advantages of the PX320 are the registration bank for saving settings and the line in feature.

There are certain risks with online shopping even if it may be cheaper upfront. Your local stores may pricematch any deal you find online.

If you are not in a hurry, there may be discounts offered throughout the holidays and after. That was the killer deal I got in January, $150 off of purchases over $500 from Music123.

About MIDI, I haven't tried it yet, we have a Mac and Casio doesn't supply a driver.

I've also heard Costco is offering the PX720 for about $650 but it is not portable.


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Oh. I've seen the PX120 online but assumed it was an older / less sophisticated model than the PX200. What's up with all these oddball model #s? Why can't they just say "This is our model 1. When it's obsolete, we'll replace it with the model 2."
Anyway, I'll now have to do some research to try to compare the PX200 with the 120 and 320. Do you have any first-hand experience as far as features, sound and most importantly, the feel of the weighted keys of the PX120/320 as compared to the PX200?

Uhg... and if this wasn't enough, while searching for the PX120 and 320, I discovered a PX110 and PX310. Hopefully those are just older models of the 120 / 320.

Thanks again.

Max.



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Casio PX-770 WE Privia

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    #14 - Casio Privia PX-110 digital piano repair

    Privia

    The Privia is a line of digital pianos and stage pianos manufactured by Casio. They have 4-layer stereo piano samples and up to 256 notes of polyphony, depending on model. All Privia models feature some kind of weighted keyboard action which simulates the action on an acoustic piano.

    First introduced in 2003, the Privia was originally designed to be a new competitor to other brands like Yamaha, Roland, and Kawai in budget digital piano products, but since then more exclusive pianos has been added to the line as well.

    Overview[edit]

    The original Privia was introduced by Casio in 2003, as a new concept within budget digital pianos, and is widely known for offering more advanced features and high-quality sound at affordable prices, being able to keep up with more expensive instruments. The first Privia was the PX-100. Like any other compact digital pianos, it was able to be played on a table or optional stand, and was equipped with a digital sound source created by independent sampling of various piano timbres.[3]

    The first generation Privia was produced from 2003 to 2006, and utilizes the Zygotech Polynomial Interpolation (ZPI) synthesis sound engine, as used in Casio's numerous former flagship keyboards. Second generation follows from 2006 to 2009, using similar sound engine.

    The third generation was introduced in 2009, featuring an all new Linear Morphing AiF (Acoustic and Intelligent Filtering) sound engine with 4-level dynamic stereo piano sampling and 128-note polyphony.

    The fourth generation is the current version of the Privia, first introduced in 2012 . It uses the improved rendition of Linear Morphing AiF engine, called Multi-Dimensional Acoustic and Intelligent Resonator (AiR) sound engine, featuring a revamped 4-layer sampling and new features such as simulated sympathetic resonance, adjustable key sensor response (referred to as "Hammer Response"), half-damper effect, pedal noises and key-off simulation.

    Minor update of fourth generation is introduced in 2015, with some models included color touchscreen and improved built-in speaker system, as well as updated various features with few models has up to 256-note polyphony.

    Keyboard action[edit]

    As with other digital pianos, the Privia features a fully weighted keyboard action to simulate the action on an acoustic piano.

    This key action consist of a mechanical system of small "hammers" and weights attached to each keys that will lift up when the key is pressed, while the keys trigger the sensors to generate sound. The sensors are located in the bottom of the keyboard, similar to that of a synthesizer keyboard action

    Throughout various incarnations, the key action has undergone several changes over time:

    Scaled Hammer Action (2003–2008 models)[edit]

    The original keyboard action, featuring a single or double sensors installed below the keybed. The weights are attached far back to the keys, giving it a slight resistance after the keys are released. It is also have a simulated weight in which lower notes are heavier than higher ones.

    Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action (2009–2011 models)[edit]

    Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer utilizes three individual sensors for each keys, two installed below the key's base, and one installed slightly further back near the hammers. The hammers are also modified to have less resistance and swings back faster upon release. The three sensors ensures precision response and improved touch sensitivity compared to its predecessor.

    Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II (2012–2018 models)[edit]

    A revamped incarnation of the previous action. The triple sensors are now installed right below the key's base, while the hammers remain unchanged. Furthermore, this action even features unique keys with simulated synthetic ebony and ivory texture and the sensor's response can be digitally adjusted to match the playing style realistically.

    The Scaled Hammer Action II has been described as being harder, more substantial and heavier compared to the previous versions. It is also widely criticized for its characteristic knocking noises when played at medium to high velocities, and considered as being heavier than a generic acoustic piano keys.

    Smart Scaled Hammer Action (2019–present models)[edit]

    Reduces size and weight without compromising playing feel. Included in PX-S1000 and PX-S3000 models.

    Models[edit]

    Models currently sold in black.

    Console models[edit]

    • 2006 : PX-700
    • 2007 : PX-720
    • 2008 : PX-800
    • 2009 : PX-730
    • 2010 : PX-830
    • 2012 : PX-750; PX-780 and PX-850
    • 2013 : PX-A800
    • 2015 : PX-760 and PX-860
    • 2017 : PX-770 and PX-870

    Standard models[edit]

    • 2003 : PX-100 – the original Privia, with Dual-Element HL sound engine
    • 2004 : PX-400R – first Privia with LCD display and auto-accompaniment capabilities
    • 2005 : PX-110 – first model with ZPI Synthesis sound engine
    • 2005 : PX-310
    • 2005 : PX-500L
    • 2006 : PX-300
    • 2007 : PX-200 – first entry-level Privia model with AiF sound engine
    • 2007 : PX-320 – first Privia model with AiF sound engine
    • 2007 : PX-410R – minor upgrade to the PX-500L
    • 2007/08 : PX-120
    • 2008 : PX-575 – the last Privia model with ZPI sound engine
    • 2009 : PX-330 – first Privia model with Linear Morphing; introducing dot-matrix LCD display, replacing the digital alphanumeric display as seen on PX-410R and PX-575
    • 2009/10 : PX-130/PX-135BK/WE – first entry-level model with Linear Morphing
    • 2012 : PX-350M – successor to the PX-330, Features the same dot matrix display, new improved 4 layer stereo piano tones with AiR sound engine, a 16 track recorder and new accompaniment capabilities.
    • 2012 : PX-150 – successor to the PX-130/135 with enhanced sampling system and the first model with the present AiR sound engine
    • 2013 : PX-A100 – Privia 10th Anniversary model, based on the PX-150 and available in red or blue color
    • 2015 : PX-160 – successor to the PX-150; minor improvements with enhanced sounds
    • 2015 : PX-360M/CGP-700 – Successor to the PX-350M; features a color touch screen and improved sounds from its predecessors, with a new proprietary Multi-Expressive Intelligence (MXi) sound engine in collaboration with the default AiR engine, as well as revamped built-in speakers.
    • 2019 : PX-S1000 and PX-S3000

    The CGP-700 includes a unique stand equipped with built-in amplification and speakers.

    The MXi sound engine was later used for Casio's latest MZ-X series of keyboard/synthesizer hybrid instrument, introduced in early 2016

    Note: the CGP-700[4](2015 model) and PX-A100/A800 Anniversary series (2013 model) was offered only in Japan and Western markets, and not available in other regions.[citation needed]

    Stage pianos (Privia PRO series)[edit]

    • 2010 : PX-7WE
    • 2011 : PX-3BK/WH – Casio's first-ever stage piano model
    • 2013 : PX-5S – stage ready variation of the PX-350, the PX-5S adds tone editing and controller capabilities and a new Ivory Touch keybed. The internal speakers and accompaniment were removed to a facilitate the new features. The PX-5S weighs under 25 lbs., holding the distinction of being the lightest stage piano ever manufactured.
    • 2015 : PX-560M – stage ready variation of the PX-360 and CGP-700, featuring the same color touch screen and auto-accompaniment function, but added synthesizer control, Hex Layers (tones with up to 6 simultaneous instruments) and sound editing capabilities, similar to that of PX-5S. Unlike the PX-5S, this model is equipped with built-in speakers.

    [edit]

    1. ^ abEarly models utilized "ZPI synthesis" were maximum 32-note polyphony.
      (Models: PX-100, PX-110, PX-300, PX-310, PX-400, PX-410, PX-500, PX-575, PX-700, etc)
    2. ^ abLatest models utilizing Linear Morphing AiF sound source are maximum 256-note polyphony, or 4-layers 32-note polyphony.
      (Models: PX-120, PX-130, PX-135, PX-200, PX-3, PX-320, PX-330, PX-7, PX-720, PX-730, PX-735, PX-800, PX-830, etc)
    3. ^"Casio Privia 10th Year Anniversary Concept, History". Casio Computer Co., Ltd. 2013. Retrieved 4 April 2014.
    4. ^"Casio CGP 700 Digital Piano". 2019-04-13. Retrieved 2019-05-11.

    External links[edit]

    Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Privia

    200 casio px

    PX-200

    The introduction to the new AiF Sound source.

    The PX-200 is a top instrument that provides a top-class sound. The favourable introduction of "AiF Sound Technology" will be of interest to all demanding amateur pianists who value an absolutely top-quality sound, but who still want all the benefits and advantages of a compact digital piano.

    128-voice polyphony

    128-voice polyphonyGuarantee an absolutely first-class piano sound. The expansion of the range of voices has made interpreting complex works a true pleasure and lets you play sweeping chords and make extensive use of the damper pedal.

    162 AiF tones

    162 AiF tonesThe innovative "Acoustic & Intelligent Filtering System" (or AiF) Sound source produces a piano sound that could hardly be any more realistic and multi-faceted, and also ensures that transitions between the individual samples and dynamic levels are as smooth as possible.

    180 samples

    180 samplesNew and additional piano samples to make the playing experience even more dynamic. This is underpinned by recordings of an absolutely top-quality instrument with a broad range of sound nuances. Expanded key splits and the 3-fold velocity split mean that there are now 180 samples available with a wave ROM of 11 MB.

    Powerful loudspeaker system

    Powerful loudspeaker systemThe powerful 2-way system with four speakers and 2 x 8 watts of output power ensures a targeted sound delivery.

    High-quality DSP effects

    High-quality DSP effectsThe PX-200 digitally reproduces the high-quality sound of a top concert grand piano complete with first-class reverb effects. The simulation of the resonating strings that is provided by the "Acoustic Resonance" CASIO effect rounds the sound experience off perfectly.

    88 Keys

    88 KeysThe scaled hammer mechanics with 88 touch-dynamic weighted keys are based on the grand piano keyboard and make for an authentic playing feel.

    20 piano rhythms

    20 piano rhythmsThe PX-200 has 20 piano rhythms that provide you with crisp new drum sounds.

    SD card slot

    SD card slotThe innovative SD memory medium offers a simple but limitless way to expand the internal song memory of the PX-200.

    3 pedals

    3 pedalsThe optional SP-30 3-pedal unit has expanded damper capability.

    USB midi

    USB midiThe tried and tested interface makes exchanging music data with the PC child's play.

    Technical Specifications

    Product Highlights

    • 162 AIF tones with DSP
    • 128-voice polyphony
    • 20 piano rhythms
    • Lightweight: only 12kg

    Specifications

    • Keyboard:
      88 keys, scaled hammer mechanism
    • Sound source:
      AIF, max. 128 voice polyphony
    • Tones:
      162 (with Layer & Split)
    • Effects:
      DSP+ acoustic resonance
      Reverb (4 types), chorus (4 types)
      Brilliance
    • Rhythms:
      20 special piano rhythms
    • Metronome:
      Beat types: 0,2,3,4,5,6
      Tempo setting: 20 to 255
    • Music library:
      Number of songs: 60 users
      Songs: up to 10, max 3.1 MB
      Learning function: part on/off (L/R)
    • Song memory (recording function):
      Functions: real-time recording, playback
      Number of songs: 5 (up to 50,000 notes)
      Number of tracks: 2
      Internal data storage: flash memory
    • Pedals:
      Damper (soft, sostenuto: can be converted)
    • Additional functions:
      Dynamic touch keys: 3 types, off
      Transposition: 1 octave (-6 to 0 to 5)
      Tuning A4 = 440.0 Hz +- 50 cents
    • MIDI:
      16-channel multitimbral
    • SD memory card:
      Media supported: up to 1 GByte
      Functions: SMF playback, store/load data
    • Connections:
      Headphones (2x mini jack, 3.5mm)
      MIDI in/out
      Line-out (standard jack 6.3mm)
      USB port (MIDI+Song Expansion): type B
      Damper pedal (standard jack)
    • Speaker:
      2x 12cm + 2x 5cm (amplification 8W+8W)
    • Measurements:
      Piano: 132.2 cm (W) x 27.8 cm (D) x 13.4 cm (H)
    • Weight:
      Piano: approx. 12.0 kg

    Specs are subject to change w/o notice.

    Sours: https://www.casio-europe.com/euro/products/musical-instruments/product-archive/privia-digital-pianos/px-200/
    Privia PX-S1100 Promotion Movie - CASIO

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