Stanford graduate school

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Aeronautics and Astronautics
PhD December 7, Aeronautics and Astronautics
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Engr December 7, Anthropology
MA Anthropology
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MS December 14, December 14, Applied Physics
PhD December 14, December 14, Art History
PhD December 1, Art Practice
MFA December 1, Biochemistry
PhD November 30, November 30, Bioengineering
PhD December 1, December 1, Bioengineering
MS December 1, December 1, Biology
PhD November 30, November 30, Biomedical Informatics
PhD November 30, November 30, Biomedical Informatics
MS November 30, November 30, Biomedical Physics
PhD December 1, December 1, Biophysics
PhD November 30, November 30, Business
PhD Business
MS Business
MBA Cancer Biology
PhD November 30, November 30, Chemical and Systems Biology
PhD November 30, November 30, Chemical Engineering
PhD December 1, December 1, Chemical Engineering
MS Chemistry
PhD December 7, December 7, Civil and Environmental Engineering
PhD December 7, December 7, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Engr December 7, December 7, Civil and Environmental Engineering
MS December 7, December 7, Classics
PhD November 30, November 30, Classics
MA Clinical Informatics Management
MS January 7, Communication
MA December 7, December 7, Communication
PhD December 7, December 7, Community Health and Prevention Research
MS January 9, January 9, Comparative Literature
PhD November 30, November 30, Computational and Mathematical Engineering
PhD November 30, Computational and Mathematical Engineering
MS January 12, Computer Science
MS December 7, Computer Science
PhD December 7, Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education (CTE)
History/Social Science Education PhD December 1, Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education (CTE)
Science and Environmental Education PhD December 1, Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education (CTE)
Literacy, Language and English Education PhD December 1, Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education (CTE)
Learning Sciences and Technology PhD December 1, Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education (CTE)
Elementary Education PhD December 1, Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education (CTE)
Teacher Education PhD December 1, Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education (CTE)
Mathematics Education PhD December 1, Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education (CTE)
MA Design Impact
MS December 1, December 1, Developmental and Psychological Sciences (DAPS)
Race, Inequality, and Language in Education PhD December 1, Developmental and Psychological Sciences (DAPS)
Developmental and Psychological Sciences PhD December 1, Developmental and Psychological Sciences (DAPS)
Learning Sciences and Technology Design PhD December 1, Developmental Biology
PhD November 30, November 30, Documentary Film and Video
MFA December 1, Earth System Science
PhD December 7, December 7, Earth System Science
MS December 7, December 7, East Asian Languages and Cultures
PhD November 30, November 30, East Asian Languages and Cultures
MA November 30, November 30, East Asian Studies
MA December 7, December 7, Economics
PhD November 30, November 30, Education Data Science
MS January 7, January 7, Electrical Engineering
MS December 7, Electrical Engineering
PhD December 7, Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources
PhD November 23, November 23, Energy Resources Engineering
PhD December 7, December 7, Energy Resources Engineering
MS December 7, December 7, English
PhD December 7, December 7, Epidemiology and Clinical Research
MS March 1, Epidemiology and Clinical Research
PhD December 7, French
MA December 7, December 7, French
PhD December 7, December 7, French and Italian
PhD December 7, December 7, Genetics
PhD November 30, November 30, Geological Sciences
PhD December 1, December 1, Geological Sciences
MS December 1, December 1, Geophysics
MS December 14, December 14, Geophysics
PhD December 14, December 14, German Studies
MA December 7, December 7, German Studies
PhD December 7, December 7, Health Policy
MS February 15, Health Policy
PhD December 7, History
PhD December 7, History
MA December 7, Human Genetics and Genetic Counseling
MS November 30, November 30, Iberian and Latin American Cultures
MA November 30, November 30, Iberian and Latin American Cultures
PhD November 30, November 30, Immunology
PhD November 30, November 30, International Comparative Education/ International Education Policy Analysis (ICE/IEPA)
International Comparative Education MA January 7, January 7, International Policy
MA January 11, January 11, Italian
PhD December 7, December 7, Laboratory Animal Science
MS January 7, January 7, Latin American Studies
MA December 1, December 1, Law
LLM, JSM, JSD, JD, MLS Learning Design and Technology (LDT)
MS January 7, January 7, Linguistics
PhD November 30, Management Science and Engineering
PhD December 1, December 1, Management Science and Engineering
MS December 14, December 14, Master of Liberal Arts
January 25, January 25, Materials Science and Engineering
MS January 4, Materials Science and Engineering
PhD November 30, Mathematics
PhD December 7, Mechanical Engineering
PhD December 1, Mechanical Engineering
MS December 1, Medicine MD Program
MD Microbiology and Immunology
PhD November 30, November 30, Modern Thought and Literature
PhD December 7, December 7, Molecular and Cellular Physiology
PhD November 30, November 30, Music
PhD December 14, December 14, Music
DMA December 14, December 14, Music
MA December 14, December 14, Neurosciences
PhD November 30, November 30, Philosophy
PhD January 4, Philosophy
MA March 15, Physician Assistant Studies
MS Physics
PhD December 14, December 14, Policy Organization and Leadership Studies (POLS)
/JD Joint Degree with Law School MA Policy Organization and Leadership Studies (POLS)
/MBA Joint Degree with Graduate School of Business MA Policy Organization and Leadership Studies (POLS)
/MPP Joint Degree with Public Policy MA January 7, January 7, Policy Organization and Leadership Studies (POLS)
Policy, Organization, and Leadership Studies MA January 7, January 7, Political Science
PhD December 1, December 1, Psychology
PhD November 30, November 30, Public Policy
MPP January 27, Public Policy
MA January 27, January 27, Religious Studies
PhD December 7, Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies
MA January 11, January 11, Slavic Languages and Literature
PhD January 4, January 4, Slavic Languages and Literature
MA January 4, January 4, Social Sciences, Humanities and Interdisciplinary Policy Studies in Education (SHIPS)
Education Data Science PhD December 1, December 1, Social Sciences, Humanities and Interdisciplinary Policy Studies in Education (SHIPS)
History of Education PhD December 1, Social Sciences, Humanities and Interdisciplinary Policy Studies in Education (SHIPS)
Educational Policy PhD December 1, Social Sciences, Humanities and Interdisciplinary Policy Studies in Education (SHIPS)
Economics of Education PhD December 1, Social Sciences, Humanities and Interdisciplinary Policy Studies in Education (SHIPS)
Organizational Studies PhD December 1, Social Sciences, Humanities and Interdisciplinary Policy Studies in Education (SHIPS)
Philosophy of Education PhD December 1, Social Sciences, Humanities and Interdisciplinary Policy Studies in Education (SHIPS)
Anthropology of Education PhD December 1, Social Sciences, Humanities and Interdisciplinary Policy Studies in Education (SHIPS)
Sociology of Education PhD December 1, Social Sciences, Humanities and Interdisciplinary Policy Studies in Education (SHIPS)
International Comparative Education PhD December 1, Social Sciences, Humanities and Interdisciplinary Policy Studies in Education (SHIPS)
Educational Linguistics PhD December 1, Social Sciences, Humanities and Interdisciplinary Policy Studies in Education (SHIPS)
Race, Inequality and Language in Education PhD December 1, Social Sciences, Humanities and Interdisciplinary Policy Studies in Education (SHIPS)
Higher Education PhD December 1, Social Sciences, Humanities and Interdisciplinary Policy Studies in Education (SHIPS)
Learning Sciences and Technology PhD December 1, Sociology
PhD December 1, Stanford Teacher Education Program (STEP)
MA January 7, January 7, Statistics
PhD December 1, December 1, Statistics
MS December 1, Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine
PhD November 30, November 30, Structural Biology
PhD November 30, November 30, Symbolic Systems
MS February 1, Theater and Performance Studies
PhD November 30,
Sours: https://gradadmissions.stanford.edu/degrees

Stanford Graduate School of Business

Professional school of Stanford University, in Stanford, California

The Stanford Graduate School of Business (also known as Stanford GSB or the GSB) is the graduate business school of Stanford University. Located in Stanford, California, for several years it has been the most selective business school in the world,[3][4] admitting only about 6% of applicants.[5]

Stanford GSB offers a general management Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree, the MSx Program (MS in Management for mid-career executives) and a PhD program, along with joint degrees with other schools at Stanford including Earth Sciences, Education, Engineering, Law and Medicine. The GSB also offers Stanford LEAD, an online professional certificate program.

History[edit]

The school was founded in when trustee Herbert Hoover formed a committee consisting of Wallace Alexander, George Rolph, Paul Shoup, Thomas Gregory, and Milton Esberg to secure the needed funds for the school's founding.[6] Willard Hotchkiss became the first dean of Stanford GSB.

The library was formally inaugurated on April 3, The collection was established with 1, volumes and assorted reports.[7] The school moved from Jordan Hall to new quarters in the History Corner of the Main Quad in [8]

Jonathan Levin was appointed as the 10th dean of the school in September [9]

Campus[edit]

Stanford Knight Management Center, seen from Serra Street.

The Knight Management Center is situated within the greater Stanford campus. There are ten buildings at the Knight Management Center: the Gunn Building, Zambrano Hall, North Building, Arbuckle Dining Pavilion, Bass Center, the Faculty Buildings (comprising East and West buildings), the Patterson Building, the MBA Class of Building, and the McClelland Building.

The Schwab Residential Center was designed by Mexican architect Ricardo Legorreta. The , square-foot facility consists of guest rooms. Jack McDonald Hall, located adjacent to Schwab, opened in as an additional residence for MBA students with over guest rooms.

There are three main art installations on campus, including Monument to Change as it Changes, Monument to the Unknown Variables, and Ways to Change.[10]

Stanford GSB maintains very close links with the venture capital, finance and technology firms of nearby Silicon Valley.[11]

Academics[edit]

Stanford GSB offers a traditional Master of Business Administration (MBA) program typically completed in two years, a Master of Science ("MSx program") typically completed in one year, and a doctoral (PhD) program.[12][13] The MBA program is a full-time graduate program that enrolls approximately students each year.

The MSx program is intended for students who are mid-career managers (minimum 8 years of professional work experience). The Stanford MSx was previously called the Stanford Sloan Master's Program, because students in the program are known as Stanford Sloan Fellows. The Stanford MSx is one of the three Sloan Fellows programs, sharing a similar format with the others at the MIT Sloan School of Management and the London Business School. These programs were initially supported by Alfred P. Sloan, Chairman of General Motors from to , who envisioned the Sloan Fellowship in his alma mater of MIT in

Academic partnerships[edit]

Stanford GSB has a number of relationships with other business schools. It offers a number of Executive Education programs jointly with Harvard Business School. It also offers one of the three Sloan Fellows programs, coordinating with the others at the MIT Sloan School of Management and the London Business School.[14]

Stanford LEAD Professional Certificate[edit]

The Stanford LEAD program (LEAD is an acronym for learn, engage, accelerate, and disrupt)[15] is a one-year online business program in the Graduate School of Business offering access to curricular materials and students specialize personal leadership. The teaching components are coordinated % online although there are periodic meet-ups hosted at Stanford each year through the me2we program.[16] The annual me2we conferences have grown to become quite large, and the program's 1, LEAD alumni can join remotely.[17]

Faculty and research[edit]

The school works at the forefront of global business research and teaching. There are four winners of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences on the faculty (William F. Sharpe , Myron Scholes , Michael Spence , Guido Imbens ), five recipients of the John Bates Clark Award, 19 members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and four members of the National Academy of Sciences.[18]

William F. Sharpe's research interests focus on macro-investment analysis, equilibrium in capital markets and the provision of income in retirement.[19] Myron Scholes’ research has focused on understanding uncertainty and its effect on asset prices and the value of options, including flexibility options.[20] Michael Spence's research interests focus on the study of economic growth and development, dynamic competition and the economics of information.[21]

Rankings[edit]

In recent rankings, GSB was ranked 1st by U.S. News & World Report,[31] 1st by Bloomberg Businessweek,[32] 1st by QS Top Universities,[33] 2nd by Forbes,[34] and in the ranking aggregator Poets & Quants Stanford's MBA Program was ranked 1st in the US.[35]

The Stanford Graduate School of Business is the most selective business school in the United States.[36] It has maintained the highest ratio of "applicants to available seats" of any business school in the U.S. for the last decade. It has also had the lowest acceptance rates (typically <7%) of any business school. For the Class of which entered in , 8% of applicants were offered admission, and the average GMAT score of and average GPA of [37] are the highest of any business school in the world.

The business school comprises the Knight Management Center, the Schwab Residential Center (named after alumnus Charles R. Schwab, founder and chairman of the Charles Schwab Corporation), and Highland Hall.

Donations[edit]

Schwab Residential Center

In August , the school announced what was then the largest gift ever to a business school—$ million from Stanford alumnus Phil Knight, MBA '62, co-founder and chairman of Nike, Inc.[38] The gift went toward construction of a $ million campus, called the Knight Management Center, for the business school. Construction was completed in

In , alumnus Robert King and his wife Dorothy made a $ million gift to the school—making history as the largest donation to Stanford GSB—to found the Institute for Innovation in Developing Economies (also known as SEED) to focus on poverty relief in emerging markets.[39] A portion of their gift is used as a matching incentive to encourage other donors to give to SEED.[40]

The gifts by King and Knight are marked as the second and third largest philanthropic pledges to a business school.[41]

Also in , investor and economist Marko Dimitrijevic, a alumni of the Business School, established the Emerging Markets Innovation Fund, to support teaching, research, and other initiatives in the area of emerging and frontier markets.[42]

Alumni[edit]

For a more comprehensive list, see List of Stanford GSB alumni.

There are 26, living alumni,[when?] including 17, alumni of the MBA program. Stanford Graduate School of Business is renowned to have produced a remarkable number of successful business leaders and entrepreneurs, many among the world's wealthiest, from its alumni base.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcdAs of September 1,
  2. ^"Stanford Graduate School of Business: School Profile". Stanford University. Retrieved March 12,
  3. ^Byrne, John A. (April 17, ). "Poets&Quants | The Most Selective MBA Programs". Poets&Quants. Retrieved September 19,
  4. ^Kowarski, Ilana (April 14, ). "10 Business Schools with Lowest Acceptance Rates".
  5. ^"Stanford MBA Class Profile | Breakdown". www.businessbecause.com. November 6, Retrieved December 5,
  6. ^Stanford University –, pg 79– J. Pearce Mitchell,
  7. ^Stanford GSB History of the library gsb.stanford.edu
  8. ^Stanford GSB Our History gsb.stanford.edu
  9. ^SGSB Press Release. May 23, Jonathan Levin Named Dean of Stanford Graduate School of Business
  10. ^"Stanford GSB Artwork &#; Stanford Graduate School of Business". Gsb.stanford.edu. Retrieved July 19,
  11. ^Lawton-Smith, Helen (August 30, ). Universities, Innovation and the Economy. Taylor & Francis. ISBN&#; &#; via Google Books.
  12. ^"Stanford MSx". Retrieved January 6,
  13. ^"Stanford MSX Class of Profile". Retrieved December 25,
  14. ^Bradshaw, Della (March 19, ). "A degree of choice for the older and wiser student". FT.com. Retrieved July 19,
  15. ^Stanford Graduate School of Business. "Stanford LEAD Program". Retrieved March 9,
  16. ^Stanford Graduate School of Business. "Stanford LEAD me2we". Retrieved March 9,
  17. ^Stanford Graduate School of Business. "In a Quick Pivot, Stanford LEAD's Annual Event Moved from On-Campus to Online". Retrieved March 30,
  18. ^Stanford GSB School profile gsb.stanford.edu
  19. ^Research statement of William F. Sharpe gsb.stanford.edu
  20. ^Research statement of Myron Scholes gsb.stanford.edu
  21. ^Research statement of Michael Spence gsb.stanford.edu
  22. ^"QS Global MBA Rankings ". Quacquarelli Symonds.
  23. ^"World University Rankings by subject: business and economics". Times Higher Education.
  24. ^"Best Global Universities for Economics and Business". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved September 25,
  25. ^"The 50 best business schools in the world ". Business Insider. Retrieved February 15,
  26. ^"Full time MBA ranking". The Economist. Retrieved January 27,
  27. ^"Global MBA Ranking ". Financial Times. Retrieved January 27,
  28. ^"Best B-Schools". Bloomberg Businessweek. November 8, Retrieved September 25,
  29. ^"The Best Business Schools". Forbes. Retrieved September 25,
  30. ^" Best Business Schools Rankings". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved September 25,
  31. ^"Best Business Schools". U.S. News & World Report.
  32. ^"Terms of Service Violation". Bloomberg Businessweek.
  33. ^"MBA Rankings - Global". Top Universities. Retrieved June 4,
  34. ^"The Best Business Schools". Forbes. Retrieved June 4,
  35. ^"Poets and Quants MBA Rankings". December 7,
  36. ^Zlomek, Erin. () India's IIM-A, the World's Toughest B-School to Get Into. Businessweek. Retrieved on
  37. ^"Stanford GSB Entering Class Profile". Retrieved November 24,
  38. ^"Nike Founder Phil Knight to Give $ Million to Stanford GSB".
  39. ^"Stanford business school receives $m gift". www.ft.com. November 4, Retrieved September 21,
  40. ^Stanford, © Stanford University; California (August 13, ). "Stanford Institute to Alleviate Poverty with $ Million Gift". Giving to Stanford. Retrieved September 21,
  41. ^Byrne, John A. (October 13, ). "Poets&Quants | Largest Donors To Business Schools". Poets&Quants. Retrieved September 21,
  42. ^"Innovating for Emerging Markets". Stanford Graduate School of Business. Retrieved September 21,

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 37°25′41″N°09′40″W / °N °W / ;

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanford_Graduate_School_of_Business
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Graduate Degrees

General Requirements

For each Stanford advanced degree, there is an approved course of study that meets University and department requirements. The University's general requirements, applicable to all graduate degrees at Stanford, are described below. University requirements pertaining to only a subset of advanced degrees are described in the "Master's" tab and "Doctoral" tab in this section of this bulletin.

See the "Graduate Programs" section of each department's listing for specific department degree requirements. Additional information on professional school programs other than Ph.D. and master’s degree programs is available in the bulletins of the Graduate School of Business, the School of Law, and the School of Medicine.

Enrollment Requirements

Graduate education at Stanford is a full-time commitment requiring full-time enrollment, typically at least eight units in each academic quarter. Unless permission is granted by the degree program (for example, for field work) enrolled graduate students are required to maintain a significant physical presence on campus throughout each quarter a student is enrolled. Prior to requesting approval to be physically distanced from campus, students should consult with the degree program as well as other university offices about potential funding, visa or other implications. Degree programs and individual faculty should include expectations about physical presence on campus in the advising expectations that are made available to students (see GAP , Academic Advising).

When considering a student’s request to be physically remote, the degree program should carefully consider the student’s ability to meet the coursework, research and teaching requirements of the program such that they can make satisfactory academic progress. In cases where the student is not able to make satisfactory academic progress and meet the requirements of the program, a leave of absence may be appropriate. Degree programs are not obligated to approve a student’s request to be away from campus.

Graduate students are required to enroll in courses for all terms of the regular academic year (Autumn, Winter, and Spring quarters) from the admission term until conferral of the degree. The only exception to this requirement occurs when the student is granted an official leave of absence (see GAP , Leaves of Absence, and GAP , Program Discontinuation and Reinstatement). 

Matriculated graduate students are expected to enroll for at least eight units during the academic year; degree programs may set a higher minimum. Petitions for programs of fewer than 8 must be signed by the student’s degree program and submitted for consideration to the Office of the Registrar. Graduate students are normally expected to enroll in no more than 24 units. (Students in programs in the Schools of Humanities & Sciences, Engineering, Earth Sciences and Education will pay tuition for each unit over The Schools of Medicine, Law, and Business do not charge for units above ) Registration for more than 24 units must be approved by the degree program.

Requests to enroll for fewer than eight units during the academic year are approved only in specific circumstances, including enrollment in the Master of Liberal Arts (M.L.A.) program, or the Honors Cooperative Program (HCP) through the Stanford Center for Professional Development (the Honors Cooperative Program). See GAP , Part-Time Enrollment.  

Failure to enroll in courses for a term during the academic year without taking an approved leave of absence results in denial of further enrollment privileges unless and until reinstatement to the degree program is granted and the reinstatement fee paid. 

Registration in Summer quarter is not required and does not substitute for registration during the academic year. Degree programs may require students to enroll in the Summer quarter. Students possessing an F-1 or J-1 student visa may be subject to additional course enrollment requirements in order to retain their legal status in the United States.

In addition to the above requirement for continuous registration during the academic year, graduate students are required by Stanford to be registered:

  1. In each term during which any official degree program or university requirement is fulfilled, including qualifying exams or the university oral exam. The period between the last day of final exams of one term and the day prior to the first day of the following term is considered an extension of the earlier term, with the option of considering the two weeks preceding the start of Autumn Quarter as part of Autumn Quarter (rather than as part of Summer Quarter).  

  2. In any term in which a dissertation/thesis is submitted or at the end of which a graduate degree is conferred.

  3. Normally, in any term in which the student receives financial support.

  4. In any term for which the student needs to use university facilities.  

  5. For international students, in any term of the regular academic year (summer may be excluded) for which they have non-immigrant status (i.e., a J-1 or F-1 visa).

Individual students may also find themselves subject to the registration requirements of other agencies (for example, external funding sources such as federal financial aid). Most course work and research are expected to be done on campus unless the degree program gives prior approval. 

Completing requirements in the two weeks before Autumn Quarter

Degree programs have the option to include the two weeks before the start of Autumn Quarter as part of Autumn Quarter for the purposes of completing milestones and programmatic requirements. The following considerations apply to this exception:

  1. The student must enroll in the subsequent Autumn Quarter in the applicable standard enrollment category prior to the completion of the milestone; a leave of absence is not permitted for that Autumn Quarter. 

  2. A student exercising this option will not be eligible for Graduation Quarter status until the following Winter Quarter at the earliest. 

  3. This exception is permitted only for milestones administered by the degree program, such as qualifying examinations or university oral examinations. 

  4. This exception does not apply to deadlines administered through Stanford University, such as filing the Application to Graduate, or Dissertation/Thesis submission.

  5. Degree programs are not obligated to exercise this option solely because a student requests it.

Sours: https://bulletin.stanford.edu/academic-policies/graduate-degrees
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Stanford Graduate School of Education

Coordinates: 37°26′N°10′W / °N °W / ;

The Stanford Graduate School of Education (also known as Stanford GSE, or GSE) is one of the seven schools of Stanford University, and is one of the top education schools in the United States. It was founded in and offers master's and doctoral programs in more than 25 areas of specialization, along with joint degrees with other programs at Stanford University including business, law, and public policy.[1]

History[edit]

School of Education building

The Graduate School of Education was founded in as the Department of the History and Art of Education, one of the original twenty-one departments at Stanford University. It awarded its first Ph.D. in , and in was renamed the Stanford University School of Education (SUSE). The Graduate School of Education building and Cubberley Library were built in , and the Stanford Teacher Education Program (STEP) was established in

In , the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation donated $5 million to establish the School Redesign Network. The GSE established a public charter school, the East Palo Alto Academy, which has been managed by its New Schools initiative since then. In , the faculty decided unanimously to make scholarly articles available as open educational resources, the first such move by a school of education. In , The GSE established an education minor program for Stanford undergraduates. The program prepares students for careers in teaching, crafting educational policy, and managing schools. In , the school name was changed to the Stanford Graduate School of Education to better reflect its advanced research and its graduate-level preparation of educators, scholars, policy makers and entrepreneurs.[2]

Academics[edit]

Stanford GSE offers ten M.A. programs and four Ph.D. programs. The school's degree programs are academic rather than professional and grant M.A. and Ph.D. degrees. It also has undergraduate honors and minors programs. As a graduate school of education, the undergraduate programs are not degree programs but instead offer education-related training for students majoring in other areas as well as co-terminal master's degrees. The largest program is the Stanford Teacher Education Program (STEP), which is the only program at the university which offers a teaching credential for K teachers.

The school also offers numerous professional development programs and resources for practicing elementary and secondary school teachers. These include the Center for the Support of Excellence in Teaching, the National Board Resource Center, the Problem-Solving Cycle, and Stanford English Learner Education Services.[3]

Rankings[edit]

Since U.S. News & World Report began ranking schools of education, Stanford has ranked among the top five overall in the United States and has received the top peer assessment score of any school each year.[4]

Notable people[edit]

Deans[edit]

Professors[edit]

  • Ralph Richard Banks, Jackson Eli Reynolds Professor of Law at Stanford Law School
  • Stephen R. Barley, Richard W. Weiland Professor of Engineering
  • William Damon, professor of education and Senior Fellow at Hoover Institute
  • Linda Darling-Hammond, Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education
  • Thomas Ehrlich, former president of Indiana University and dean of Stanford Law School
  • Elliot Eisner, Lee Jacks Professor of Education, Emeritus, recipient of the Grawemeyer Award
  • Nathaniel Gage, Margaret Jacks Professor of Education, Emeritus
  • James G. March, Jack Steele Parker Professor, Emeritus
  • Clifford Nass, Thomas M. Storke Professor of Communications
  • Nel Noddings, Lee L. Jacks Professor of Child Education, Emeritus
  • Roy Pea, David Jacks Professor of Education and the Learning Sciences
  • John R. Rickford, J.E. Wallace Sterling Professor of Linguistics and the Humanities
  • Lee Shulman, Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education, Emeritus
  • Lewis Terman, creator of the Stanford Binet IQ Test
  • John Willinsky, Khosla Family Professor of Education

Alumni[edit]

  • Dwight W. Allen, educational reformist and scholar
  • Moyra Allen, founder of the Canadian Journal of Nursing Research
  • Aimee Allison, radio host of KPFA, FM in Berkeley, California
  • Juan Arambula, former member of the California State Assembly
  • Laura Arrillaga-Andreessen, philanthropist
  • Brian Auld, president, Tampa Bay Rays
  • Harold R. W. Benjamin, educator and author
  • David Berliner, educational psychologist
  • Wilma Chan, California State AssemblyMajority Leader, –
  • William J. Crowe, former United States Ambassador to the United Kingdom and former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
  • Rolando Ramos Dizon, former president of Taguig City University, former chairman of the Commission on Higher Education, and former president of De La Salle University
  • Selden Edwards, writer and educator
  • Kieran Egan, educational philosopher
  • March Fong Eu, 25th Secretary of State of California
  • Mary Alice Ford, member of the Oregon House of Representatives
  • Leon R. Hartshorn, author, religion professor at Brigham Young University
  • Mohammed Waheed Hassan, Vice President of the Maldives
  • Reed Hastings, founder and CEO of Netflix and former president of the California State Board of Education
  • Stephanie Kaza, professor of environmental studies at University of Vermont
  • Neeru Khosla, co-founder and chair of CK Foundation
  • Leo Long, competitive javelin thrower
  • Giselle O. Martin-Kniep, educator and author
  • James Allen McCain, former president of the University of Montana
  • H. Brett Melendy, American historian
  • Jon Nakamatsu, classical pianist
  • Penelope Peterson, dean of the Northwestern University School of Education
  • Ann M. O'Leary, senior policy advisor, Hillary Clinton presidential campaign,
  • Imanol Ordorika Sacristán, Mexican social activist
  • Steve Sampson, US Men's National Soccer Team Coach
  • Dale Schunk, dean of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro School of Education
  • Henry Sheldon, educator and historian
  • James H. Shelton, former deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Education
  • Mari Simonen, deputy executive director of the United Nations Population Fund
  • Piya Sorcar, founder and CEO, TeachAIDS
  • Sybil Stockdale, co-founder, National League of Families
  • Alejandro Toledo, former president of Peru
  • Carlos Alberto Torres, professor of education at the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies
  • Floyd Wilcox, former president of Shimer College
  • Becky Worley, ABC journalist

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanford_Graduate_School_of_Education

School stanford graduate

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